Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave

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Penguin Group USA, Apr 30, 1968 - Biography & Autobiography
4 Reviews
Frederick Douglass (c.1818 1895) was born into slavery but escaped in 1838, quickly becoming involved in the abolitionist movement. Following publication in 1845 of this autobiography he risked recognition and recapture by his owner, and so fled the United States. This reissue is of the Dublin edition of 1845, with a preface by Douglass explaining his reasons for his journey to Britain. Opening with a touching explanation of how he doesn't know his birthday, Douglass describes his early life and the growing awareness of the injustices he suffered. The beatings he witnessed and received himself are described in painful detail. Later, Douglass highlights the hypocrisy of the 'slaveholding religion of this land', condemning it as 'the grossest of libels'. The eloquence of the writing, with an immediacy and honesty found shocking at the time, make this an invaluable first-hand record of one of humanity's most shameful acts.

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User Review  - DVerdecia - LibraryThing

This was a very compelling story of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. I found it a very interesting read and do recommend it. I also found the story to have an underlying meaning which is why I ... Read full review

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User Review  - sighedtosleep - LibraryThing

This book is not bad, but I've had to read it so many times for school, in so many different classes, that I don't want to see this book ever again. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
v
Section 2
21
Section 3
27
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

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About the author (1968)

Frederick Douglass was born a slave and escaped to freedom in his twenties. "My Bondage and My Freedom" (1855) was written after he had established himself as a newspaper editor. In this book, Douglass expands upon his previous accounts of his years as a slave. With great psychological penetration, he probes the long-term and corrosive effects of slavery and comments upon his active resistance to the segregation he encounters in the North.