Nasser's Blessed Movement: Egypt's Free Officers and the July Revolution

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Oxford University Press, Jan 9, 1992 - History - 272 pages
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This book examines a key period in the formation of modern Egypt, the early years of military rule following the coup of 1952. The Free Officers, a secret organization of junior officers, overthrew Egypt's parliamentary regime in July 1952 and over the next few years consolidated their rule, brutally suppressing alternative political movements. Gamal Abdel Nasser, one of the young officers, emerged as the leader of the military junta and launched an ambitious program for economic development, making Egypt a leader in Arab, African, and non-aligned politics, as well as a model for political mobilization and national development throughout the Third World. Focusing on the goals, programs, successes, and failures of the young regime, Gordon provides the most comprehensive account of the Egyptian revolution to date. Besides bringing to light newly opened American and British sources on the period, Gordon's book is also informed by interviews he conducted with a number of actors and observers of the events.
 

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Contents

Rewriting the Revolution
3
1 A Country of Failure
14
2 The Peoples Army
39
3 Revolutionary Jurisprudence
58
4 Lift up Your Head
79
5 The Great Deception
92
6 The Secret of the Nine
109
7 A Revolutionary Not a Politician
127
8 Stability in Whatever Guise
144
9 Fondest Hopes of the West
157
10 Each of You Shall Be Gamal
175
A Pragmatic March Toward Democracy?
191
Notes
201
Bibliography
233
Index
243
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