Natasha's Dance: A Cultural History of Russia

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Macmillan, Oct 17, 2003 - History - 768 pages
5 Reviews

Beginning in the eighteenth century with the building of St. Petersburg and culminating with the Soviet regime, Figes examines how writers, artists, and musicians grappled with the idea of Russia itself--its character, spiritual essence, and destiny. Skillfully interweaving the great works--by Dostoevsky, Stravinsky, and Chagall--with folk embroidery, peasant songs, religious icons, and all the customs of daily life, Figes reveals the spirit of "Russianness" as rich and uplifting, complex and contradictory--and more lasting than any Russian ruler or state.

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NATASHA'S DANCE: A Cultural History of Russia

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

An immensely learned, ambitious effort to view Russian history through the lens of its arts, music, and literature.A skilled practitioner of both narrative and intellectual history, Figes (History ... Read full review

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User Review  - fourbears - LibraryThing

I'm tempted to say that this is a great book because like Russian art it has a soul, but that sounds presumptuous since I've not an expert on any Russian art and I've never been to Russia. But I've ... Read full review

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About the author (2003)

Orlando Figes is the author of A People's Tragedy, and recipient of the Wolfson Prize for History and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, among others. A regular contributor to The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Times Literary Supplement, he is a professor of history at the University of London. He lives in Cambridge, England.

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