National Identity in Russian Culture: An Introduction

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Simon Franklin, Emma Widdis
Cambridge University Press, Feb 2, 2006 - Literary Criticism - 260 pages
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What is Russia? Who are Russians? What is 'Russianness'? The question of national identity has long been a vexed one in Russia, and is particularly pertinent in the post-Soviet period. For a thousand years these questions have been central to the work of Russian writers, artists, musicians, film-makers, critics, politicians and philosophers. Questions of national self-identity permeate Russian cultural self-expression. This wide-ranging study, designed for students of Russian literature, culture, and history, explores aspects of national identity in Russian culture from medieval times to the present day. Written by an international team of scholars, the volume offers an accessible overview and a broad, multi-faceted introductory account of this central feature of Russian cultural history. The book is comprehensive and concise; it combines general surveys with a wide range of specific examples to convey the rich texture of Russian cultural expression over the past thousand years.
 

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Contents

Section I Identities in time and space
9
us and them
51
Section III Essential identities
93
Section IV Symbols of identity
169
Afterword
217

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About the author (2006)

Simon Frankin is Reader in Slavonic Studies at the University of Cambridge. He is the author of The Emergence of Rus 750-1200 (with Jonathan Shepard, 1996).

Emma Widdis is Lecturer in Russian at the University of Cambridge. She is the author of Visions of a New Land: Soviet Film from the Revolution to the Second World War (2003).

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