National Judicial Reporting Program, 1990

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DIANE Publishing, Jun 1, 1993 - 51 pages
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Describes the number and characteristics of felons convicted in Sate courts in 1990 in the Nation overall. Includes: felony sentencing (offenses, sentence types, and sentence lengths), demographic characteristics of convicted felons, felons sentenced to probation, and felony case processing (conviction types and time to disposal). Charts, tables and graphs.
 

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Page 13 - Additional penalties are penalties imposed in addition to the primary penalty of jail, prison, or probation. Examples of penalties in the category 'other' are community control, house arrest, work release, drug testing, and loss of driver's license. Where the data indicated affirmatively that a particular additional penalty was imposed, the case was coded accordingly. Where the data did not indicate affirmatively or negatively, the case was treated as not having an additional penalty. These procedures...
Page 12 - Appendix 14. *Detail may not sum to total because of rounding. "includes nonnegligent manslaughter. 'includes offenses such as negligent manslaughter. sexual assault. and kidnaping. lncludes motor vehicle theft. *includes forgery and embezzlement. 'Composed of nonviolent offenses such as receiving stolen property and vandalism Source: US Department of Justice.
Page 13 - Detail may not sum to total because of rounding "includes nonnegligent manslaughter °includes offenses such as negligent manslaughter, sexual assault, and kidnaping lncludes motor vehicle theft 'includes forgery and embezzlement Composed of nonviolent offenses such as receiving stolen property and vandalism Source: US Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics.
Page 7 - ... *Composed of nonviolent offenses such as receiving stolen property and immigration offenses.
Page 6 - Note: For persons receiving a combination of sentences, the sentence designation came from the most severe penalty imposed — prison being the most severe, followed by jail, then probation. Prison includes death sentences.
Page 10 - Detail may not sum to total because of rounding. "includes nonnegligent manslaughter. 'includes offenses such as negligent manslaughter, sexual assault, and kidnaping. "includes motor vehicle theft. "includes forgery and embezzlement fLess than 0.5 percent.
Page 3 - Larceny-Unlawful taking or attempted taking of property (other than a motor vehicle) from the possession of another, by stealth, without force and without deceit, with intent to permanently deprive the owner of the property.
Page 3 - The unlawful taking or attempted taking of property that is in the immediate possession of another, by force or threat of force.
Page 3 - ... attempts. Fraud. forgery. and embezzlement-Using deceit or intentional misrepresentation to unlawfully deprive a person of his or her property or legal rights. includes offenses such as check fraud. confidence games. counterfeiting. and credit card fraud. includes attempts. Drug possession-includes possession of an illegal drug. but excludes "possession with intent to sell.
Page 1 - According to the severity of the punishment the crime is classed as a felony, that is a crime punishable by death or by imprisonment in the state prison ; or as a misdemeanor, that is any crime where the punishment is less severe. The punishment is graded according to the nature of the offense. Murder, for instance, is a felony punishable by death, because nothing can be of greater importance than the security of life, and a man who...

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