Nationalism and Internationalism: Their Origin and Development

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University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1919 - 162 pages
 

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Page 50 - They solemnly declare that the present Act has no other object than to publish in the face of the whole world their fixed resolution, both in the administration of their respective States and in their political relations with every other Government, to take for their sole guide the precepts of that Holy Religion, namely the precepts of Justice, Christian Charity and Peace...
Page 49 - Men had promised themselves an all-embracing reform of the political system of Europe, guarantees for universal peace, in one word, the return of the golden age. The Congress has resulted in nothing but restorations, which had already been effected by arms, agreements between the Great Powers of little value for the future balance and preservation of the peace of Europe, quite arbitrary alterations in the possessions of the...
Page 49 - has resulted in nothing but restorations, which had already been effected by arms, agreements between the Great Powers of little value for the future balance and preservation of the peace of Europe, quite arbitrary alterations in the possessions of the smaller...
Page 50 - ... both in the administration of their respective states, and in their political relations with every other Government, to take for their sole guide the precepts of that holy religion, namely, the precepts of justice, Christian charity and peace, which, far from being applicable only to private concerns must have an immediate influence upon the counsels of princes, and guide all their steps, as being the only means of consolidating human institutions and remedying their imperfections.
Page 49 - Gentz in his account of the final results of the Congress, "has perhaps never been roused to such a pitch as before the opening of this dignified assembly. Men had promised themselves an all-embracing reform of the political system of Europe, guarantees for universal peace, in one word, the return of the golden age.
Page 51 - Its only aim is to favour the internal prosperity of each state and the general welfare of all, which ought to be the outcome of the friendship between their sovereigns, made all the more indissoluble by the fact that it is independent of accidental causes.
Page 26 - European confederation, it would be necessary to place all its constituent states in such a condition of mutual dependence that no one of them should be in a position to resist the rest. If, under the system of the Balance of Power, states are limited in their opportunities for aggression, what would their position be when there is a great armed league, ever ready to prevent those who might wish to destroy or resist it? Such a league would...
Page 26 - ... had a powerful effect upon the proposals of the European statesmen for the settlement of Europe a hundred years later after the Napoleonic Wars...
Page 51 - Vincent when he said it to be an attempt to "disguise under the language of evangelical self-abnegation, schemes of far-reaching ambition".
Page 43 - Its terras pledged the successful prosecution of the war and the collective protection or guarantee of territorial and other arrangements agreed upon as the result of a successful war.

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