Native American Languages Act of 1991: Hearing Before the Select Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, on S. 2044 to Assist Native Americans in Assuring the Survival and Continuing Vitality of Their Languages, June 18, 1992, Washington, DC.

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1992 - Law - 252 pages
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In June 1992, a Senate hearing received testimony on the need for federal aid for maintenance of Native American languages. Such aid would fund community language facilities and programs, training of Native speakers as teachers, development of instructional materials, and compilation of oral materials. A speaker from the Administration for Native Americans (DHHS), while supporting the preservation of Native languages, argued that existing federal grant programs are sufficient to meet these purposes. Representatives of American Indian tribes, Alaska Native villages, and organizations discussed the connection between language maintenance and cultural preservation, the importance of both language and culture to ethnic identity and self-esteem, and the status of Native language instruction and bilingual education in their areas. Linguists described the status and viability of Native languages in the United States, and discussed the importance of the existence of a broad range of living languages to the study of linguistics. Six papers from the journal "Language" discuss language loss and endangered languages worldwide; the Hualapai Bilingual/Bicultural Education Program in Peach Springs, Arizona; the Rama Language Project in Nicaragua; the collaboration of native speakers and professional linguists in Guatemala in developing Mayan linguistics; and the human value of linguistic diversity. Also included are many supporting statements and letters from organizations and individuals. (SV)

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