Native Son

Front Cover
Vintage, 2000 - African American men - 454 pages
30 Reviews

'The most important and celebrated novel of Negro life to have appeared in America' - James Baldwin

Gripping and furious, Native Son follows Bigger Thomas, a young black man who is trapped in a life of poverty in the slums of Chicago. Unwittingly involved in a wealthy woman's death, he is hunted relentlessly, baited by prejudiced officials, charged with murder and driven to acknowledge a strange pride in his crime. Native Son shocked readers on its first publication in 1940 and went on to make Richard Wright the first bestselling black writer in America.

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User Review  - electrascaife - LibraryThing

Powerful, tense, and moving, this story of a young black man in 1950's Chicago stumbling from a life of petty crimes into one of a wanted and then convicted murderer via a series of tragically bad ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Scott_Hercher - LibraryThing

Provocative and entertaining, Native Son by Richard Wright, should be required reading. Wright uses words like razors, and the dialogue often reads with the urgency of a great pulp novel. In between ... Read full review

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About the author (2000)

Richard Wright was born near Natchez, Mississippi, in 1908. As a child he lived in Memphis, Tennessee, then in an orphanage, and with various relatives. He left home at fifteen and returned to Memphis for two years to work, and in 1934 went to Chicago, where in 1935, he began to work on the Federal Writers' Project. He published Uncle Tom's Children in 1938 and was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in the following year. After the Second World War, he went to live in Paris with his wife and daughters, remaining there until his death in 1960.

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