Natural Kinds and Conceptual Change

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Jan 29, 2009 - Philosophy - 232 pages
0 Reviews
In this illuminating book, Joseph LaPorte argues that scientists have not discovered that sentences about natural kinds are true rather than false. Instead, scientists have found that these sentences were vague in the language of earlier speakers and they have refined the meanings of these terms to make the sentences true. In the process, however, they have also changed the meaning of these terms. This book will appeal to students and professionals in the philosophy of science, the philosophy of biology and the philosophy of language.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 What Is a Natural Kind and Do Biological Taxa Qualify?
8
2 Natural Kinds Rigidity and Essence
33
3 Biological Kind Term Reference and the Discovery of Essence
63
4 Chemical Kind Term Reference and the Discovery of Essence
92
5 Linguistic Change and Incommensurability
112
6 Meaning Change Theory Change and Analyticity
150
Notes
175
References
201
Index
215
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information