Natural History of New York ...: Agriculture. 5 v

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D. Appleton & Company and Wiley & Putnam, 1851 - Natural history
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Page 245 - ... consequently fit to aid the process of vegetable life. All animal matter is fitted for the same purpose. Butchers' offal, such as the blood and intestines of animals, form a most powerful manure. It is in general necessary to dilute such manure by admixture with other kinds less powerful in their action. One hundred parts of dry bones contain from 32 to 33 per cent. of dry gelatine ; now supposing this to contain the same quantity of nitrogen as animal glue, viz., 5.28 per cent., then 100 parts...
Page 190 - ... the elements composing them, and the best form in which these elements can be combined to meet all the wants of the being. As I have already said, functional endowments must be considered ; hence...
Page 189 - ... productive returns. But to do this requires probably more knowledge of soils and of the cultivated vegetables than we now possess. The object is to supply without waste, to cheapen the product by the expenditure of the least...
Page 189 - PERFECTED agriculture can result only from nice adjustments — a determination of the nature of the matter to be dealt with and its inherent forces, combined with a special knowledge of the individual organization and its functional wants. Defective products are mainly due to functional wants; there are no truly diseased products or disorganized organs. Graduate the supplies to the nutrient powers, satisfy the capacities of the plant at the proper time, and, all other things being adjusted, the...
Page 190 - As already said, functional endowments must be considered ; hence, to pursue that course with a plant which will give it an early vigorous constitution, a full development of its organs in its first stages, and the foundation is laid for the full amount of the products sought.
Page iii - Your own recommendations ami influence, touching these great interests, are highly appreciated by the people, as is evident from their united movements in establishing institutions which are designed to bear directly upon those objects, and which are specially designed to place them upon a scientific basis.
Page 231 - ... governed by a law which, while it marks the groups with characters transmissible to their offspring, still not one group, or an individual of a group, is merged in any of the near or remote species. I remark again, that specific character is never destroyed by external influences ; in those influences where a species is changeable, and readily breaks up into groups whose characteristics are transmissible from the parents to their offspring, the specific character is never uprooted ; and in fact...
Page 228 - The constitutive power to multiply varieties is only a part of their specific characters. If we turn our thoughts to the animal kingdom for illustration of the same principle, for example, we find the elephant is apt to learn, while the rhinoceros or hippopotamus rarely possess this aptitude in the smallest degree ; the positive character of the first is as important specifically, as the negative in the latter. If, then, by gradation of character, it is designed to convey the idea that species coalesce,...
Page 229 - If, then, by gradation of character, it is designed to convey the idea that species coalesce, by the resemblances in their varieties, the idea is erroneous ; if, however, the phrase is designed to convey or express the fact, that in the system to which they belong, some species occupy a higher position than others, or that there are grades of development, some of which are high and others low, it is undoubtedly true. The position which a species holds is positive and arbitrary ; species occupy a...
Page 326 - This is a result somewhat unexpected, inasmuch as the value of oil-cakes in the feeding of stock has hitherto been supposed to depend very much upon their power of laying on fat: in other words, upon the per-centage...

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