Natural History of Animals: Containing Brief Descriptions of the Animals Figured on Tenney's Natural History Tablets, But Complete Without the Tablets

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Scribner, 1866 - Zoology - 261 pages
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A brief description of the animal kingdom: mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fishes, insects, crustaceans, mollusks, echinoderms and protozoans.
 

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Page 23 - These animals were extremely savage, and were confined in separate wooden cages. They were about four feet long, from the nose to the tip of the tail ; and with the exception of a greater length of body and a longer tail, they very much resembled diminutive hyenas. They are fed with pounded Guinea corn, and dried fish made into balls. The civet is scraped off with a kind of muscle shell every other morning, the animal being forced into a corner...
Page 126 - ... reach. Most insects, in the course of their lives, are subject to very great changes of form, attended by equally remarkable changes in their habits and propensities. These changes, transformations, or metamorphoses, as they are called, might cause the same insect, at different ages, to be mistaken for as many different animals. For example, a caterpillar, after feeding upon leaves till it is fully grown, retires into some place of concealment, casts off its caterpillar-skin, and presents itself...
Page 144 - They are very common in groves and about bushes late in the summer. Closely related to these is the Mountain Butterfly, which is found only on Mount Washington, in New Hampshire. Fig. 269. — Mountain Butterfly. SKIPPERS. Skippers are butterflies which have a short body, large head, and large eyes ; and the antennae have the knob at the end either curved like a hook or ending in a little point bent to one side. They are called Skippers because they fly with a jerking motion. They are generally of...
Page 157 - These flies sometimes move in immense swarms in search of fields of their favorite grain where they may lay their eggs. The Hessian Fly received its...
Page 167 - Entomologists now use the word bug for various kinds of insects, all, like the bed-bug, having the mouth provided with a slender beak, which, when not in use, is bent under the body, and lies upon the breast between the legs. This instrument consists of a horny sheath, containing, in a groove along its upper surface, three stiff bristles as sharp as needles. Bugs have no jaws, but live by sucking the juices of animals and plants, which they obtain by piercing them with their beaks.
Page 216 - ... time. They look somewhat like Chrysanthemum blooms, the orange-colored projections consisting of a gelatinous substance projecting from a central ball, chocolate in color and of a firm texture. During dry times the horns apparently disappear and only these central knots or galls are to be seen, varying from the size of a pea to an inch or more in diameter. The horns of jelly contain the spores and as they dry down the spores are carried away as dust by the passing breezes. This is in April or...
Page 19 - ... Mrs. Lee records the following instance of the force of the pointer's instinct : — " Mr. Gilpin speaks of a brace of pointers, who stood an hour and a quarter, without moving. This, however, was exceeded by Clio, a dog belonging to my father, who stood with her hind legs upon a gate for more than two hours, with a nest of partridges close to her nose. She must have seen them as she jumped over the gate, and had she moved an inch, they would have been frightened away. My father went on, and...

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