The Nature and Origins of Japanese Imperialism: A Re-interpretation of the 1873 Crisis

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Routledge, Feb 1, 2013 - History - 384 pages
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This important book, which many will regard as controversial, argues convincingly that the Japanese imperialism of the first half of the Twentieth Century was not a temporary aberration.
The author looks at the detail of the great crisis of 1873 and shows that the prospect of economic gain through overseas expansion was the central issue of that year's political struggles. He goes on to show that Japan had a long, earlier history of aiming for economic expansion overseas; and that Japan's Twentieth Century imperialism grew out of this.
In addition, he argues convincingly that much of the writing about Japan has played down the true extent and nature of Japanese imperialism.
 

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Contents

ICDUIbDJNH INTRODUCTION
TOKUGAWA JAPAN
SHINTOS BRIEF HISTORY
THE NATURE OF JAPANESE IMPERIALISM
THE POWER STRUGGLE IN HOKKAIDG
THE RULE OF
THE TOSA CLAN GODAI AND THE OPENING OF KOREA
CONCLUSION
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