Nature and Science on the Pacific Coast: A Guide-book for Scientific Travelers in the West

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P. Elder, 1915 - Animals - 302 pages
 

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Page 2 - Mexico, the end may be perhaps better attained than at Panama. All this is reserved for the future and for an enterprising spirit. So much, however, is certain, that if they succeed in cutting such a canal that ships of any burden and size can be navigated through it from the Mexican Gulf to the Pacific Ocean, innumerable benefits would result to the whole human race, civilized and uncivilized. But I should wonder if the United States were to let an opportunity escape of getting such a work into...
Page 1 - There are mountains, but there are also hands. Give me the resolve, and the task will be accomplished. If determination is not lacking, means will not fail; the Indies, to which the way is to be made, will furnish them. To a king of Spain, seeking the wealth of Indian commerce, that which is possible is also easy.
Page 14 - ... shattered and one or two trees struck in the past 60 years. HAIL. There have been 56 hailstorms in the past 20 years. January and December are the months of maximum frequency. There is no record of any hailstorm occurring during June, July, August, and September. SNOWSTORMS. Snow is of rare occurrence. During winter storms the tops of the hills in the southwestern portion of the city are occasionally whitened by snowflakes. These melt rapidly and snow of appreciable depth is rare. However, snow...
Page ix - There were no hotels in California, every door was open, and food, lodging, a fresh horse, and money even were free to the guest whether friend or stranger. No white man had to concern himself greatly with work, and even school books were a thing apart. Music, games, dancing and sprightly conversation — these were the occupations of the time — these constituted education. Also men and women were much in the open. All were expert horsemen, could throw...
Page 12 - ... another class of high winds experienced at San Francisco, namely, the north-northeast winds of November, December, and occasionally January. These winds are different from the northwest winds of summer and are distinctly mountain winds. The highest wind velocity recorded in San Francisco, 64 miles from the northeast, occurred on November 30, 1906. The most prevalent high wind of winter is from the southwest, closely followed by the southeast. The latter is the well-known wind preceding winter...
Page 183 - This task was to construct and erect ' a powerful telescope, superior to and more powerful than any telescope ever yet made, with all the machinery appertaining thereto and appropriately connected therewith * * * * and also a suitable observatory.
Page 13 - Island . ... In winter, morning fogs, or, as they are commonly called "tule" fogs, frequently occur. These are low-lying banks of condensed vapor formed by cooling due to radiation and contact. The land surfaces are much cooler than the water surfaces, and hence these fogs have a decided motion from the land to the sea. The average number of foggy days is 24 per year. For a detailed description of fog phenomena in the vicinity of San Francisco the reader is referred to special articles in the Monthly...
Page 64 - The oils of the Coalinga district are believed to have been derived from two different sources, namely, the organic shales forming the uppermost member of the Chico (Upper Cretaceous) and those described as the upper portion of the Tejon (Eocene). It is believed that the oil originated from the organic matter, both vegetable and animal, once contained in these beds. The shales are composed in large part of the tests of...
Page ix - No white man had to concern himself greatly with work, and even school books were a thing apart. Music, games, dancing, and sprightly conversation — these were the occupations of the time — these constituted education. Also, men and women were much in the open; all were expert horsemen, could throw a lasso, and shoot unerringly, even the women, accomplishments which fitted their type of life, and made hunting a general pastime. When foreign ships came, there were balls and the gayest of festivals,...
Page 14 - December, 1889, 13.81 inches fell and there were 24 rainy days; in December, 1880, 12.33 inches fell and there were 19 rainy days. Number of rainy days in the year. — In the past 62 years, 1850 to 1911, there have been 4,207 rainy days. The yearly distribution is: January, 11; February, 10; March, 11; April, 6; May, 4; June, 1; July, 0; August, 0; September, 2; October, 4; November, 7; December, 11. For the year, average number 67. MONTHLY RAINFALL. JANUARY. From records covering a period of 63...

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