Nature Study for the Common Schools

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H. Holt, 1891 - Science - 448 pages
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Page 7 - Yet, it is a very plain and elementary truth that the life, the fortune, and the happiness of every one of us, and, more or less, of those who are connected with us, do depend upon our knowing something of the rules of a game infinitely more difficult and complicated than chess. It is a game which has been played for untold ages, every man and woman of us being one of the two players in a game of his or her own. The chess-board is the world, the pieces are the phenomena of the universe, the rules...
Page 7 - My metaphor will remind some of you of the famous picture in which Retzsch has depicted Satan playing at chess with a man for his soul. Substitute for the mocking fiend in that picture a calm, strong angel who is playing for love, as we say, and would rather lose than win — and I should accept it as an image of human life.
Page 7 - The chess-board is the world, the pieces are the phenomena of the universe, the rules of the game are what we call the laws of nature. The player on the other side is hidden from us. We know that his play is always fair, just, and patient. But also we know, to our cost, that he never overlooks a mistake, or makes the smallest allowance for ignorance. To the man who plays well the highest stakes are paid with that sort of overflowing generosity with which •the strong shows delight in strength. And...
Page 7 - Now, it is a very plain and elementary truth that the life, the fortune, and the happiness of every one of us, and, more or less, of those who are connected with us, do depend upon our knowing something of the rules of a game infinitely more difficult and complicated than chess. It...
Page 133 - If a certain mass be weighed first in air then in water, and the weight in air divided by the loss of weight in water...
Page 6 - Suppose it were perfectly certain that the life and fortune of every one of us would, one day or other, depend upon his winning or losing a game of chess. Don't you think that we should all consider it to be a primary duty to learn at least the names and the moves of the pieces; to have a notion of a gambit, and a keen eye for all the means of giving and getting out of check? Do you not think that we should look with a disapprobation amounting to scorn upon the father who allowed his son, or the...
Page 5 - ... nature. The final motive for the study of science is to bring the pupil by degrees to a strong personal realization that he is the focus of innumerable forces about him which so bear upon him, and so limit his life and comfort as to render the knowledge of how they may be resisted, guided, and controlled an absolute necessity. Life, ultimately his own life, is the great...
Page 2 - Within these early interpretations lie the beginnings of the reasoning power, and with its development comes self-reliance, independence of thought, and a general strength of character which marks a man among men. If a pupil be permitted to carefully examine an object or a set of conditions, and then...
Page iii - PREFACE. In the preparation of this book it has been the aim to...
Page 2 - It is a proposition needing no demonstration that without these conceptions the reasoning faculty is simply powerless. But true science work does not stop with mere seeing, hearing, or feeling; it not only furnishes a mental picture as a basis for reasoning, but it includes an interpretation of what has been received through the senses. A child and a goat may see the same thing, with the advantage of vision on the side of the goat; but the latter has no power to interpret what he sees, and is, therefore,...

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