Nazis and Good Neighbors: The United States Campaign Against the Germans of Latin America in World War II

الغلاف الأمامي
Cambridge University Press, 04‏/08‏/2003 - 359 من الصفحات
This international history uncovers an American security program in which Washington reached into fifteen Latin American countries to seize more than 4,000 German expatriates and intern them in the Texas desert. The crowd of Nazi Party members, antifascist exiles, and even Jewish refugees were lumped together in camps riven by strife. The book, first published in 2003, examines the evolution of governmental policy, its impact on individuals and emigrant communities, and the ideological assumptions that blinded officials in both Washington and Berlin to Latin American realities. Franklin Roosevelt's vaunted Good Neighbor policy was a victim of this effort to force reluctant Latin American governments to hand over their German residents, while the operation ruined an opportunity to rescue victims of the Holocaust. This study makes a very contemporary argument: that security measures based on group affiliation rather than individual actions are as unjust and ineffective in foreign policy as they are in law enforcement.
 

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المحتويات

Contamination
13
Assessment
47
Blacklisting
74
Deportation
102
Internment
135
Justice
156
Expropriation
167
Repatriation
192
The New Menace
221
There Went the Neighborhood
229
Notes
237
Glossary
303
Select Bibliography
305
Index
337
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مقاطع مشهورة

الصفحة 1 - ... seize control of the oceans is but a counterpart of the Nazi plots now being carried on throughout the Western Hemisphere - all designed toward the same end. For Hitler's advance guards - not only his avowed agents but also his dupes among us have sought to make ready for him footholds and bridgeheads in the New World, to be used as soon as he has gained control of the oceans.

حول المؤلف (2003)

Max Paul Friedman is Assistant Professor of History at Florida State University. His work has been published in Diplomatic History, The Americas, and The Oral History Review. Before entering academia he was assistant producer for National Public Radio's 'All Things Considered' and a freelance writer published in the Washington Post, New York Newsday, Atlanta Constitution, Cleveland Plain Dealer, Orlando Sentinel, and other newspapers and magazines.

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