Neanderthals, Bandits and Farmers: How Agriculture Really Began

Front Cover
Yale University Press, 1998 - Social Science - 53 pages
1 Review
Tradition has it that agriculture began in the Middle East around 10,000 years ago, that once people realized the advantages of farming, it spread rapidly to the furthest outposts of the world, and that this led to the Neolithic Revolution and the end of the hunting-gathering lifestyle. In this book Colin Tudge argues that agriculture in some form was in the repertoire of our ancestors for thousands of years before the Neolithic farming revolution: people did not suddenly invent forced into it over a long period. What we see in the Neolithic Revolution is not the beginning of agriculture on a large scale, in one place, with refined tools.Drawing on a wide range of evidence from fossil records to the Bible, Tudge offers a persuasive hypothesis about a puzzling epoch in our past. In so doing, he provides new insights into the Pleistocene overkill, the demise of the Neanderthals, the location of the biblical Eden, and much more. Copyright © Libri GmbH. All rights reserved.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ritaer - LibraryThing

This interesting, short book attempts to completely revise the accepted views on the origins of agriculture. Tudge suggests that early humans began to manipulate their food supply by spreading favored ... Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

nm

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
29
Section 3
49
Section 4
51
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1998)

Colin Tudge is one of Britain's leading science writers. A research fellow at the Centre for Philosophy at the London School of Economics, he is the author of, most recently, "The Second Creation" (FSG, 2000) with Ian Wilmut & Keith Campbell.

Bibliographic information