Negotiating a Perilous Empowerment: Appalachian Women's Literacies

Front Cover
Ohio University Press, Jul 19, 2011 - Literary Criticism - 256 pages
0 Reviews

In many parts of Appalachia, family ties run deep, constituting an important part of an individual’s sense of self. In some cases, when Appalachian learners seek new forms of knowledge, those family ties can be challenged by the accusation that they have gotten above their raisings, a charge that can have a lasting impact on family and community acceptance. Those who advocate literacy sometimes ignore an important fact — although empowering, newly acquired literacies can create identity conflicts for learners, especially Appalachian women. In Negotiating a Perilous Empowerment, Erica Abrams Locklear explores these literacy-initiated conflicts, analyzing how authors from the region portray them in their fiction and creative nonfiction.

 Abrams Locklear blends literacy studies with literary criticism to analyze the central female characters in the works of Harriette Simpson Arnow, Linda Scott DeRosier, Denise Giardina, and Lee Smith. She shows how these authors deftly overturn stereotypes of an illiterate Appalachia by creating highly literate characters, women who not only cherish the power of words but also push the boundaries of what literacy means. Negotiating a Perilous Empowerment includes in-depth interviews with Linda Scott DeRosier and Lee Smith, making this an insightful study of an important literary genre.

 


 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Appalachia on Our Pages
23
Shaping Biscuit Dough and Rolling Out Steel
56
Narrating Socialization
92
Overcoming Backgrounds
142
Invasion of the Mountain Teachers
174
Epilogue
229
Notes
235
Works Cited
240
Index
251
Acknowledgments
255
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Erica Abrams Locklear is an assistant professor in the Literature and Language department at the University of North Carolina at Asheville. She has published articles in the Southern Literary Journal, Crossroads: A Southern Culture Annual, Community Literacy Journal, and the North Carolina Folklore Journal.

Bibliographic information