Negritude Agonistes, Assimilation Against Nationalism in the French-speaking Caribbean and Guyane

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Africana Homestead Legacy Pb, 2008 - History - 226 pages
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Assesses European and French colonialism in the Caribbean from the 16th century and the racial and cultural movements of black and mixed-race people in the French-speaking West Indies and Guyane that emerged in the 19th century and first half of the 20th century. Contrasts the proponents for and against assimilation to the political and social constructs of France. Rare excerpts from the issue of L'Etudiant Noir Journal Mensuel de l'Association des Etudiants Martiniquais en France (The Black Student Journal ...) where Aimé Césaire first used the word Negritude and the previously unpublished poetry of Léon Damas are important focal points of the author's historical analysis and literary criticism
 

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This is a negritude primer that tells in great details where negritude came from, why it was expressed and when it came into being. The other important thing about this book is that it contains the issue of the student newspaper, l’Etudiant Noir, where the word and concept of negritude were enunciated for the first time in 1935. The author was close to the principal proponents of negritude, and that makes this essential negritude primer even more valuable.  

Contents

Introduction
1
Chapter One The Birth of the French West Indies
6
Chapter Two Le Code Noir The French Black Code
12
Chapter Three The 1789 French Revolution and Political Developments in The French West Indies
16
Chapter Four France and the Spirit of Integration
22
Chapter Five AbolitionView by Victor Schoelcher
26
Chapter Six The Assimilation of the Colonies
30
Chapter Seven Interaction of Peoples and Races in the Frenchspeaking Caribbean
36
Chapter Thirteen Coming to Terms with AfricaHaitian Nationalism
84
Chapter Sixteen The Enunciation of NegritudeThe New French Negro
118
Chapter Seventeen PigmentNegritude in Revolt
134
Chapter Eighteen Césaire Negritude and Politics in the French West Indies
142
Conclusion
146
Appendix Interview with Josie Fanon Frantz Fanons Widow
154
Notes
162
Bibilography
176

Chapter Eight The ColoniesVictory and Defeat
48
Chapter Nine AbolitionThe Role of Cyrille Charles Auguste Bissette and Armand Barbes
54
Chapter Ten Haiti in Literature from Independence to the American Occupation
62
Chapter Eleven The Literature of the French West Indies and French Guiana from Emancipation to Publication of Batouala
72
Chapter Twelve The New Trend Batouala and the Color Line
80
Index
184
About the Author
224
The Beggars Pursuit
226
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Christian Filostrat earned a PhD from Howard University and served in the US diplomatic corps. He is a researcher in the field of French Caribbean politics and literature and a lifelong student of the oral tradition and literature of Africa. As part of his research he discussed the negritude struggle (agonistes) with Leopold S. Senghor, Aimé Césaire, and Léon Damas. Filostrat is the author of the article, “La Negritude et 'conscience raciale et revolution sociale' d'Aime Cesaire” and lectured on the subject at the Université des Mutants on Gorée Island in Senegal. In Negritude Agonistes, Assimilation against Nationalism in the French-speaking Caribbean and Guyane Filostrat includes an illustration from L'Etudiant Noir... that shows the first time Césaire used negritude in his writing. Christian Filostrat is also a novelist and the author of The Beggars' Pursuit, a political thriller about the US and the Democratic Republic of the Congo which includes the negritude proponents' activities in Paris, circa 1936. The Gospel of Thomas, his second novel, is religious fiction about US intervention in an upcoming papal election.

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