Neo-avant-garde

Front Cover
David Hopkins
Rodopi, 2006 - Art - 454 pages
0 Reviews
The neo-avant-garde of the 1950s, 60s and 70s, is due for a thoroughgoing reassessment. This collection of essays represents the first full-scale attempt to deal with the concept from an interdisciplinary standpoint. A number of essays in this book concentrate on fine art, particularly painting and sculpture, thereby adding significantly to the growing art historical literature in the field, but a number of the contributions also focus on poetry, performance, theatre, film, architecture and music. Given that there are also major essays here dealing with geographical blindspots in current neo-avant-garde studies, with thematic issues such as art's entanglement with gender, mass culture and politics, with key neo-avant-garde publications, and with the purely theoretical problems attaching to the theorisation of the topic, this collection offers a multi-dimensional approach to the subject which is noticeably lacking elsewhere. Taken together these essays represent a consolidated attempt at re-thinking the 'cultural logic' of the immediate post-World War II period.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Marcel Duchamp Robert Morris and NeoAvantGarde Irony
19
Frank OHaras Process Poems
37
NeoDada Junk Aesthetic and Spectator Participation
49
ACROSS ART FORMS
73
NeoDada Performance Art
75
On the Reconciliation of Tradition and Invention in Concrete Poetry
97
Ruptures and Continuities in AvantGarde Art
119
CENTRESPERIPHERIES
143
Joe Brainards Queer Seriousness or How to Make Fun out of the AvantGarde
277
DISCOURSEPOLITICS
299
The Conversational Aesthetic of Conceptual Art
301
Towards a Situationist AvantGarde Today
311
DISSEMINATION
331
Movens or The Aesthetics of Movement as a Programmatic Perspective
333
Long Live the AvantGarde
351
THEORETICAL REFLECTIONS
369

Minimal Requirements of the PostWar AvantGarde of the 1960s
145
The Ruptura Proclaimed by Brazils SelfStyled Vanguardas of the Fifties
161
Architecture and the NeoAvantGarde in 1960s Brazil
197
HIGHLOW
221
Robert Desnos and Philippe Soupault
223
Richard Hamilton Domesticity and PostAvantGardism
243
BODYGENDER
261
Gender Trouble? Body Trouble? Reinvestigating the Work of Marisol Escobar
263
Towards a Reconciliation of Man and Nature Nature and Ecology in the Aesthetic AvantGarde of the Twentieth Century
371
Production Structure and Obedience in John Cages Lecture on Nothing
389
The Repetition Trauma and Deferred Completion of the AvantGarde
403
List of Illustrations
423
Abstracts
427
Contributors
437
Index
445
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 41 - At a certain moment the canvas began to appear to one American painter after another as an arena in which to act —rather than as a space in which to reproduce, re-design, analyze or "express" an object, actual or imagined.
Page 25 - Pollock . . . left us at the point where we must become preoccupied with and even dazzled by the space and objects of our everyday life, either our bodies, clothes, rooms, or, if need be, the vastness of Forty-Second Street.
Page 29 - It seemed that there had been a reality there that had not had any expression in art. The experience on the road was something mapped out but not socially recognized. I thought to myself, it ought to be clear that's the end of art. Most painting looks pretty pictorial after that. There is no way you can frame it, you just have to experience it.
Page 21 - I am for an art that takes its form from the lines of life itself, that twists and extends and accumulates and spits and drips, and is heavy and coarse and blunt and sweet and stupid as life itself.
Page 29 - This drive was a revealing experience. The road and much of the landscape was artificial, and yet it couldn't be called a work of art.
Page 43 - Personal Poem Now when I walk around at lunchtime I have only two charms in my pocket an old Roman coin Mike Kanemitsu gave me and a bolt-head that broke off a packing case when I was in Madrid the others never brought me too much luck though they did help keep me in New York against coercion but now I'm happy for a time and interested...
Page 4 - Yet it is true that once the avant-garde had succeeded in "detaching" itself from society, it proceeded to turn around and repudiate revolutionary as well as bourgeois politics. The revolution was left inside society, a part of that welter of ideological struggle which art and poetry find so unpropitious as soon as it begins to involve those "precious" axiomatic beliefs upon which culture thus far has had to rest.

About the author (2006)

David Hopkins is Professor of Art History at the University of Glasgow. His previous publications include After Modern Art 1945-2000 (2000), Dada and Surrealism: A Very Short Introduction (2004) and Marcel Duchamp and Max Ernst: The Bride Shared ( 1998 ) all published by Oxford University Presss.

Bibliographic information