Neoplatonism and Gnosticism

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Richard T. Wallis, Jay Bregman
SUNY Press, 1992 - Religion - 531 pages
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In recent decades our view of Gnosticism has been revolutionized by the discovery of a Coptic Gnostic library at Nag-Hammadi, Egypt. Currently, Gnosticism is seen as a phenomenon extending far beyond Christianity and displaying a strong Platonic influence. The opposition between the two systems was certainly not as sharp as Plotinus claimed. Where, why, and how the ideological lines were drawn is discussed in the light of the new historical evidence.
 

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Contents

A Controversial Issue in Hellenistic Thought and Religion
9
Platonic Gnostic and Christian
33
The Second God in Gnosticism and Plotinuss AntiGnostic Polemic
55
Synesius the Hermetica and Gnosis
85
A Comparative Study
99
Plotinuss AntiGnostic Polemic and Porphyrys Against the Christians
111
Theological Doctrines of the Latin Asclepius
129
Negative Theology in Gnosticism and Neoplatonism
167
Theurgic Tendencies in Gnosticism and Iamblichuss Conception of Theurgy
253
Beauty Number and Loss of Order in the Gnostic Cosmos
277
Theories of Procession in Plotinus and the Gnostics
297
A Christian and a Platonic Refutation of Manichaean Dualism
337
Le Nombre et son Ombre Resume
351
Questions on Self
381
The Platonizing Sethian Texts from Nag Hammadi in their Relation to Later Platonic Literature
425
Soul and Nous in Plotinus Numenius and Gnosticism
461

The Platonism of the Tripartite Tractate NH I 5
187
The Noetic THad in Plotinus Marius Victorinus and Augustine
207
The Myth of Eros and Psyche in Plotinus and Gnosticism
223
The Name of the Father is the Son Gospel of Truth 38
239
Higher Providence Lower Providences and Fate in Gnosticism and Middle Platonism
483
Index
509
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About the author (1992)

Richard T. Wallis was Associate Professor of Classics at the University of Oklahoma.

Jay Bregman is Professor of History at the University of Maine, Orono.

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