Neruda at Isla Negra

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White Pines Press, 1998 - Poetry - 127 pages
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Few writers are as integrally bound to a place as Pablo Neruda was to the landscape of Isla Negra. From his arrival there in the late '30s to his death in 1973, Isla Negra became a text that unraveled in a series of essential images that are fundamental to an understanding of his mature work.

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Neruda at Isla Negra

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This collection combines three short works--House in the Sand, The Stones of Chile, and Seaquake--translated in 1986, 1990, and 1993, respectively. All three were inspired by the desolate Chilean ... Read full review

Contents

Los NombresThe Names
16
La Medusa IThe Medusa 118
22
Some Words for a Book of Stone
29
La Tierna MoleThe Tender Bulk
98
Sol de MarSun of the Sea
122
Copyright

About the author (1998)

Pablo Neruda was born Ricardo Eliecer Neftalí Reyes Basoalto in Ferral, Chile on July 12, 1904. In 1923 he sold all of his possessions to finance the publication of his first book, Crepusculario (Twilight), which he published under the pseudonym Pablo Neruda. Veinte Poemas de Amor y una Cancion Desesperada (Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair), which was published the following year, made him a celebrity and allowed him to stop his studies to devote himself to poetry. His other works include España en el Corazón, Canto General, Las Uvas y el Viento, and Para Nacer He Nacido. He received numerous awards including the World Peace Prize with Paul Robeson and Pablo Picasso in 1950, the Lenin Peace Prize and the Stalin Peace Prize in 1953, and the Nobel Prize for Literature for his poetry in 1971. He died of leukemia on September 23, 1973.

Dennis Maloney is a poet and translator. His works of translation include The Poet and the Sea: Poems of Juan Ramon Jimenez, The House in the Sand by Pablo Neruda, The Landscape of Castile by Antonio Machado and Between the Floating Mist: Poems of Ryokan. His most recent volume of poetry is Just Enough.

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