Nevada's Historic Buildings: A Cultural Legacy

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University of Nevada Press, 2009 - Architecture - 224 pages
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In 1991, the Nevada Commission for Cultural Affairs was created to oversee the preservation of the state's historic buildings and the conversion of the best of them for use as cultural centers. Nevada's Historic Buildings highlights 90 of these buildings, setting them into the context of the state's history and the character of the people who created and inhabited them. The selections reflect the innovation of early settlers struggling to make a home in an austere environment, as well as the diversification over time of Nevada's economy and population. These buildings are reminders of mining boomtowns, historic ranches, the transportation industry, the divorce and gaming industries, the New Deal and other federal programs, the prosperity of the last half of the twentieth century, and the innovations of Las Vegas's postmodern aesthetic. Their stories reflect the people and events that shaped Nevada. Book jacket.
 

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Contents

A Territory of Humble Beginnings
11
A State of International Fame
26
The Other Early Nevada
52
A New Century
79
After the Boom
124
A New Deal
145
Inventing the Future
175
Learning from Remnants of the Past
189
Bibliography
211
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About the author (2009)

Ronald M. James is Nevada’s Historic Preservation Officer and author of The Roar and the Silence: A History of Virginia City and the Comstock Lode and Temples of Justice: County Courthouses of Nevada (both from University of Nevada Press), and others.


Elizabeth Safford Harvey teaches history at Merced College. She has worked on Nevada listings for the National Register of Historic Places, conducted interviews for the Comstock Oral History Project, and served as a research consultant for the Nevada Historic Preservation Office.
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