New Grub Street

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Oxford University Press, 1998 - Fiction - 540 pages
9 Reviews
New Grub Street (1891), George Gissing's most highly regarded novel, is the story of men and women forced to make their living by writing. Their daily lives and broken dreams, made and marred by the rigors of urban life and the demands of the fledgling mass communications industry, are presented with vivid realism and unsentimental sympathy. Its telling juxtaposition of the writing careers of the clever and malicious Jaspar Milvain and the honest and struggling Edward Reardon quickly made New Grub Street into a classic work of late Victorian fiction.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jmoncton - LibraryThing

This very long classic is an interesting look at the lives of struggling writers during the Victorian era. What I found fascinating, is that the writers fell into 3 categories: successful 'literary ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - patrickgarson - LibraryThing

This tale of literary paupers deals with poverty in an atypically clear-eyed way, but Gissing does have some weaknesses playing against this strength. Pity those educated without means; forbidden from ... Read full review

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About the author (1998)

John Goode is at Keele University.

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