New Grub Street

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Penguin UK, Sep 29, 2005 - Fiction - 560 pages
9 Reviews
In New Grub Street George Gissing re-created a microcosm of London's literary society as he had experienced it. His novel is at once a major social document and a story that draws us irresistibly into the twilit world of Edwin Reardon, a struggling novelist, and his friends and acquaintances in Grub Street including Jasper Milvain, an ambitious journalist, and Alfred Yule, an embittered critic. Here Gissing brings to life the bitter battles (fought out in obscure garrets or in the Reading Room of the British Museum) between integrity and the dictates of the market place, the miseries of genteel poverty and the damage that failure and hardship do to human personality and relationships.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jmoncton - LibraryThing

This very long classic is an interesting look at the lives of struggling writers during the Victorian era. What I found fascinating, is that the writers fell into 3 categories: successful 'literary ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - patrickgarson - LibraryThing

This tale of literary paupers deals with poverty in an atypically clear-eyed way, but Gissing does have some weaknesses playing against this strength. Pity those educated without means; forbidden from ... Read full review

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About the author (2005)

George Robert Gissing was born on November 22, 1857, and died on December 28, 1903. He was an English novelist who published 23 novels between 1880 and 1903. Recent years have seen a strong revival of interest in Gissing, many of whose novels are now available in reprints. A bridge between late Victorianism and early modernism, Gissing's novels combine two essential themes of the period; the isolation and struggle of the artist and the economic bondage of the proletariat. New Grub Street (1891) and his own indirect autobiography, The Private Papers of Henry Ryecroft (1903), reveal the close connection in Gissing between fiction and autobiography. Workers in the Dawn (1880) and Demos: A Story of English Socialism (1892) dramatizes Gissing's conviction that economic and class divisions are central to human character and individual destiny. Gissing died from emphysema at age 46 after catching a chill on an ill-advised winter walk. Verinilda was published incomplete in 1904. He is is buried in the English cemetery at Saint-Jean-de-Luz.

Bernard Bergonzi was born in London, England on April 13, 1929. He was a poet, critic, and professor. He taught English literature at Manchester University and Warwick University, where he remained until he retired in 1992. He wrote monographs on H. G. Wells, T. S. Eliot, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Thomas Arnold, and Graham Greene. His other books included Manchester: The Early H. G. Wells, Heroes' Twilight, The Situation of the Novel, The Myth of Modernism, Exploding English, The Roman Persuasion, Wartime and Aftermath, War Poets and Other Subjects, A Victorian Wanderer, and A Study in Greene. He died on September 20, 2016 at the age of 87.

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