New Letter-writer, for the Use of Ladies: Embodying Letters on the Simplest Matters of Life, and on Various Subjects, with Applications for Situations, Etc., and a Copious Appendix of Forms of Address, Bills, Receipts and Other Useful Matter

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F.A. Brady, 1867 - 139 pages
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Page 125 - Charles has told me that you have made such an impression on him, that he knows not how to be happy in any one else, and it gives me great happiness to find that he has placed his affections on so worthy an object. Indeed it has been my principal study to instruct him in the principles of our holy religion ; well knowing that those who do not fear God will never pay any regard to domestic duties.
Page 126 - I tell you it is my real opinion you can never place your affection on a more worthy young man than my son. He is endowed with more real worth than thousands of others whom I have known ; and I have been told of instances of his benevolence which he has industriously concealed. I have only to add further...
Page 132 - However light you may make of promises, yet I am foolish enough to consider them as something more than trifles ; and am likewise induced to believe that the man who voluntarily breaks a promise will not pay much regard to an oath ; and if so, in what light must I consider your conduct ? Did I not give you my promise to be yours, and had you no other reason for soliciting than merely to gratify your vanity ? A brutal gratification, indeed, to triumph over the weakness of a woman whose greatest fault...
Page 125 - Nay, so far is she from having any objections, that she would have waited on you as the bearer of this, had I not persuaded her against it, as she has been these three days afflicted with a severe cold, and I was afraid that if she had ventured abroad so soon, it might be attended with dangerous consequences.
Page 123 - I received your letter last night, and as it was on a subject I had not yet any thoughts of, you will not wonder when I tell you, I was a good deal surprised. Although I have seen you at different times, yet I had not the most distant thought of your making proposals of such a nature. Those of your sex have often...
Page 73 - If any consolation can be afforded under so heavy an affliction as you have just experienced, it must come from a higher power than mine. Your own strong sense of religion, and of our duty of resignation to a power that is beyond our control, and a will that is ever beneficently directed towards our good, must uphold you in this most bitter trial. I well know how painful the well-meant, but often mistaken...
Page 56 - You wish to know whether I am willing to enter again into the marriage state, and in event of my being so, whether I should be adverse to admitting you in the quality of a suitor. I assure you, sir, I feel flattered by the latter question, and as to the former, I can only say, that I have no dislike to entering again into that state.
Page 131 - I will not go to any tavern, but as soon as my work is done, return home to my dearly beloved Sally. I hope, my dear, you will not be angry, for I am really in love. I cannot be happy unless you are mine. I was afraid to mention this to you...
Page 132 - A brutal gratification, indeed, to triumph over the weakness of a woman whose greatest fault was that she loved you. I say loved you, for it was in consequence of that passion I first consented to become yours. Has your conduct, sir, been consistent with my submission, or with your own solemn profession ? Is it consistent with the character of a gentleman, first to...
Page 130 - The Lady's prudent answer. SIR, Though thoroughly conscious in this act I make a breach of those laws said to be laid down .for lovers, especially such of our sex as would rather be celebrated for a romantic turn of mind, than for what is more...

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