New Media Language

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Psychology Press, 2003 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 209 pages
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New Media Language brings leading media figures and scholars together to debate the shifting relations between today's media and contemporary language.
From newspapers and television to email, the Internet and text messaging, there are ever increasing media conduits for news. This book investigates how developments in world media have affected, and been affected by, language. Exploring a wide range of topics, from the globalization of communication to the vocabulary of terrorism and the language used in the wake of September 11, New Media Language looks at the important and wide-ranging implications of these changes. From Malcolm Gluck on wine writing, to Naomi Baron on email, the authors provide authoritative and engaging insights into the ways in which language is changing, and in turn, changes us.
With a foreword by Simon Jenkins, New Media Language is essential reading for anyone with an interest in today's complex and expanding media.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Modern media discourse
5
Poles apart globalization and the development of news discourse across the twentieth century
7
Modern media myths
18
Globalizing communication
27
The new incivility threat or promise?
36
Parochializing the global language and the British tabloid press
45
Modes of the media
55
Wine language useful idiom or idiotspeak?
107
Rhetoric bluster and online gaffes the tough life of a spindoctor
116
Politics is marriage and show business a view from recent Taiwanese political discourse
126
Emotional DIY and proper parenting in Kilroy
136
Language and American good taste Martha Stewart as massmedia role model
146
The effect of the media on language
157
Noun phrases in media texts a quantificational approach
159
Compressed nounphrase structures in newspaper discourse the competing demands of popularization vs economy
169

Reportage literature and willed credulity
57
Speaking to Middle England Radio Four and its listeners
65
Literacy and the new media
75
Why email looks like speech proofreading pedagogy and public face
85
Online news a new genre?
95
Representations and models
105
Newspapers and neologisms
182
Reliable authority tabloids film email and speech as sources for dictionaries
187
From Armageddon to war the vocabulary of terrorism
193
Index
204
Copyright

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The Magazines Handbook
Jenny McKay
No preview available - 2006
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About the author (2003)

After many years lecturing with the University of London (at the London School of Economics and Political Science), Jean Aitchison was Professor of Language and Communication at the University of Oxford (1993 2003) and is now an Emeritus Professor. She is the author of a number of books on language, including The Language Web (Cambridge University Press, 1997).

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