New South Wales Constitution Bill: The Speeches, in the Legtislative Council of New South Wales, on the Second Reading of the Bill for Framing a New Constitution for the Colony

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T. Daniel, 1853 - Constitutions - 232 pages
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Page iv - That an humble Address be presented to her Majesty, praying that her Majesty will be graciously pleased to...
Page 12 - I AB do sincerely promise and swear, That I will be faithful, and bear true allegiance, to their Majesties King William and Queen Mary: So help me God.
Page 89 - If civil society be the offspring of convention, that convention must be its law. That convention must limit and modify all the descriptions of constitution which are formed under it. Every sort of legislative, judicial, or executory power are its creatures. They can have no being in any other state of things ; and how can any man claim, under the conventions of civil society, rights which do not so much as suppose its existence ? Rights which are absolutely repugnant to it...
Page 42 - Every new election in the States is found to change one half of the representatives. From this change of men must proceed a change of opinions ; and from a change of opinions, a change of measures.
Page 89 - Whatever each man can separately do, without trespassing upon others, he has a right to do for himself; and he has a right to a fair portion of all which society, with all its combinations of skill and force, can do in his favor. In this partnership all men have equal rights, but not to equal things.
Page 89 - Men cannot enjoy the rights of an uncivil and of a civil state together. That he may obtain justice, he gives up his right of determining what it is in points the most essential to him. That he may secure some liberty, he makes a surrender in trust of the whole of it.
Page 48 - It is of great importance in a republic not only to guard the society against the oppression of its rulers, but to guard one part of the society against the injustice of the other part.
Page 41 - Democratic institutions awaken and foster a passion for equality which they can never entirely satisfy. This complete equality eludes the grasp of the people at the very moment at which it thinks to hold it fast, and
Page 20 - Be it therefore enacted by the Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords spiritual and temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same...
Page 89 - If civil society be made for the advantage of man, all the advantages for which it is made become his right. It is an institution of beneficence ; and law itself is only beneficence acting by a rule.

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