New South Wales Constitution Bill: The Speeches, in the Legtislative Council of New South Wales, on the Second Reading of the Bill for Framing a New Constitution for the Colony

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T. Daniel, 1853 - Constitutions - 232 pages
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Page 95 - Society requires not only that the passions of individuals should be subjected, but that even in the mass and body as well as in the ' • * individuals, the inclinations of men should frequently be thwarted, their will controlled, and their passions brought into subjection.
Page viii - That an humble Address be presented to her Majesty, praying that her Majesty will be graciously pleased to...
Page 145 - Because half a dozen grasshoppers under a fern make the field ring with their importunate chink, whilst thousands of great cattle reposed beneath the shadow of the British oak chew the cud and are silent, pray do not imagine that those who make the noise are the only inhabitants of the field, — that, of course, they are many in number, — or that, after all, they are other than the little, shrivelled, meagre, hopping, though loud and troublesome insects of the hour.
Page 16 - I AB do sincerely promise and swear, That I will be faithful, and bear true allegiance, to their Majesties King William and Queen Mary: So help me God.
Page 94 - Far am I from denying in theory ; full as far is my heart from withholding in practice, (if I were of power to give or to withhold,) the real rights of men. In denying their false claims of right, I do not mean to injure those which are real, and are such as their pretended rights would totally destroy.
Page 53 - It is of great importance in a republic, not only to guard the society against the oppression of its rulers; but to guard one part of the society against the injustice of the other part.
Page 20 - Melbourne, and bounded on the north and northeast by a straight line drawn from Cape How to the nearest source of the river Murray, and thence by the course of that river to the eastern boundary of the colony of South Australia...
Page 141 - Sir, the eloquence of Mr. CALHOUN, or the manner of his exhibition of his sentiments in public bodies, was part of his intellectual character. It grew out of the qualities of his mind. It was plain, strong, terse, condensed, concise; sometimes impassioned — still always severe. Rejecting ornament, not often seeking far for illustration, his power consisted in the plainness of his propositions, in the closeness of his logic, and in the earnestness and energy of his manner.
Page 16 - Canada once at least in every Year, so that a Period of Twelve Calendar Months shall not intervene between the last Sitting of the...
Page 15 - ... directly or indirectly, himself, or by any other person in trust for him, or for his use or benefit, or on his account, undertake, execute, hold, or enjoy, in whole or in part, any contract or agreement, made or entered Into in behalf of the United States...

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