New Spirit, New Sculpture, New Money: Art in the 1980s

Front Cover
Yale University Press, 2003 - Art - 493 pages
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"The 1980s began with an aggressive attempt to reassert the old dominance of painting. But a major exhibition in London, 'A new spirit in painting', included some like Per Kirkeby and A. R. Penck, who regarded paint on canvas as only one way of working among many. It also gave prominence to a range of figurative painters exploring fresh territory. Artists as substantial as Georg Baselitz and Anselm Kiefer finally began to receive the attention they deserved. The decade also witnesses a flowering of art from women. An impressive number, including Helen Chadwick, Shirazeh Houshiary, Magdelena Jetelova, Cindy Sherman and Alison Wilding, played a distinguished part in the vitality of the new art. Meanwhile, interest grew in work beyond the familiar Euro-American boundaries, particularly from Africa, Bangladesh, the Caribbean, India and Japan. Corks also explores the wildly excessive reputation-making of sthe 1980s, spurred on by inflated prices in an ominously overheated market, and charts the decline of New York's dominance of the art world" - back cover.
 

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Contents

The Flowering of Womens Art 27 November 1980
26
Art from Modern Africa 29 January 1981
34
New Art at the Tate 15 September 1983
42
Richard Deacon S April 1985
50
Julian Opie 2 May 1985
56
Magdalena Jetelova 26 September 1985
62
Helen Chadwick 12 June 1986
69
Stephen Cox 21 August 1986
76
Meret Oppenheini 2 November 1989
308
The Saatchi Gallery Opens 23 March 1985
316
The Turner Gallery 9 April 1987
322
Two New Contemporary Galleries 7 May 1987
330
The Tate of the North 2 June 1988
337
Canadas new National Gallery 22 September 1988
343
Charles Simonds and Pier + Ocean 28 May 1980
352
Sport and Art 20 September 1980
358

Julian Schnabel 2 October 1986
84
Tony Cragg 26 March 1987
91
Boyd Webb 28 May 1987
98
25 June 1987
106
NY Art Now 24 September 1987
113
The Shortcomings of the Turner Prize 3 December 1987
119
Deacon and Cragg 15 December 1988
133
JeanMichel Basquiat 12 March 1996
146
Dan Graham 7 January 1982
161
Robert Rauschenberg 7 May 1981
250
Late Guston 18 November 1982
258
Francis Bacon 6 June 1985
266
Patrick Heron 29 August 1985
273
Lee Friedlander 7 August 1986
280
Cy Twombly 22 October 1987
287
David Boniberg in Retrospect i8 February 1988
294
Leon Kossoff 6 October 1988 3i
301
New Sculpture Outdoors 11 November 1980
366
Hockney at the Opera 4 June 1981
370
Art and Architecture 25 January 1982
378
Artists in School Residencies 7 April 1983
386
Les Levine on the Street 19 September 1985
394
Sculpture in the Open 8 May 1986
402
State of the Art 13 February 1987
410
David Mach 28 April 1988
416
Tess Jaray at Victoria Station 9 June 1988
424
Anger and Hope in 1985 19 December 1985
440
Heathrow Blues 25 September 1986
450
Treasures at Risk 22 December 1988
466
Trees in Extremis 13 August 1989
474
Index
482
Credits
492
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Richard Cork is now senior art critic at The Times (London). He is the author of numerous works, including Art Beyond the Gallery in Early Twentieth-Century England (winner of the Bannister Fletcher Award for best art book of the year), David Bomberg, and A Bitter Truth: Avant-Garde Art and the Great War, all published by Yale University Press.

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