New York Teachers' Monographs, Volume 3

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New York Teachers' Monographs Company, 1900 - Education
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Page 30 - This would be an adaptation to actual business of the spiritual truth that " to him that hath shall be given ; but from him that hath not shall be taken away even that which he seemeth to have.
Page 91 - I remember the gleams and glooms that dart Across the school-boy's brain; The song and the silence in the heart, That in part are prophecies, and in part Are longings wild and vain. And the voice of that fitful song Sings on, and is never still: 'A boy's will is the wind's will, And the thoughts of youth are long, long thoughts.
Page 11 - Thoughts hardly to be packed Into a narrow act, Fancies that broke through language and escaped; All I could never be, All, men ignored in me, This, I was worth to God, whose wheel the pitcher shaped.
Page 95 - A man should have a farm or a mechanical craft for his culture. We must have a basis for our higher accomplishments, our delicate entertainments of poetry and philosophy, in the work of our hands. We must have an antagonism in the tough world for all the variety of our spiritual faculties, or they will not be born.
Page 95 - To read well, that is, to read true books in a true spirit, is a noble exercise, and one that will task the reader more than any exercise which the customs of the day esteem. It requires a training such as the athletes underwent, the steady intention almost of the whole life to this object. Books must be read as deliberately and reservedly as they were written.
Page 92 - Action is with the scholar subordinate, but it is essential. Without it he is not yet man. Without it thought can never ripen into truth.
Page 86 - He felt there was too much to do and too little time to do it in.
Page 115 - ... the papers again, by expressing each hinted sentiment at length, and as fully as it had been expressed before, in any suitable words that should come to hand. Then I compared my Spectator with the original, discovered some of my faults, and corrected them.
Page 115 - With this view I took some of the papers, and, making short hints of the sentiment in each sentence, laid them by a few days, and then, without looking at the book...
Page 107 - Few teachers can resist such an influence, and, in spite of it, teach according to their better knowledge and judgment. They cannot feel free if they would.

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