New York Teachers' Monographs, Volume 8

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New York Teachers' Monographs Company, 1906 - Education
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Page 91 - my pretty one, sleep." Sleep and rest, sleep and rest, Father will come to thee soon, Rest, rest, on mother's breast, Father will come to thee soon, Father will come to his babe in the nest, Silver sails all out of the west, Under the silver moon, Sleep, my little one, sleep, my pretty one, sleep. What
Page 90 - Sweet and low, sweet and low, Wind of the western sea, Low, low, breathe and blow, Wind of the western sea! Over the rolling waters go, Come from the dying moon, and blow, Blow him again to me: While my little one, while my pretty one, sleeps.
Page 90 - Sweet and low, sweet and low, Wind of the western sea, Low, low, breathe and blow, Wind of the western sea! Over the rolling waters go, Come from the dying moon and blow, Blow him again to me; While my little one, while my pretty one, sleeps.
Page 66 - The smith, a mighty man is he, With large and sinewy hands; And the muscles of his brawny arms Are strong as iron bands. His hair is crisp, and black, and long, His face is like the tan; What is
Page 70 - Thanks, thanks, to thee, my worthy friend, For the lesson thou hast taught! Thus at the flaming forge of life Our fortunes must be wrought; Thus on its sounding anvil shaped Each burning deed and thought. —Henry W. Longfellow.
Page 69 - Toiling,—rejoicing,—sorrowing, Onward through life he goes; Each morning sees some task begun, Each evening sees it close; Something attempted, something done, Thanks, thanks, to thee, my worthy friend, For the lesson thou hast taught! Thus at the flaming forge of life Our fortunes must be wrought; Thus on its sounding anvil shaped Each burning deed and thought. —Henry
Page 67 - You can hear him swing his heavy sledge, With measured beat and slow, Like a sexton ringing the village bell, When the evening sun is low. And children coming home from school Look in at the open door; They love to see the flaming forge, And hear the bellows roar, And catch the burning sparks that fly Like chaff from a threshing floor.
Page 73 - the merry brown thrush sings away in the tree, To you and to me, to you and to me; And he sings all the day, little girl, little boy, "Oh, the world's running over with joy! But long it won't be, Don't you know, don't you see? Unless we are as good as can be I
Page 44 - thirteenth birthday ; that said child is able to read and write simple sentences in the English language and has received instruction during such period in reading, spelling, writing, English grammar and geography, and is familiar with the fundamental operations of arithmetic up to and including fractions.
Page 98 - 4. The supper being over, the strangers requested to be shown to their place of repose. 5. But the lark is so brimful of gladness and love, the green fields below him, the blue sky above.

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