New and Improved Practical Gardener and Modern Horticulturist

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Thomas Kelly, 1856 - Flower gardening - 972 pages
 

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Page 838 - But who can paint Like Nature? Can imagination boast, Amid its gay creation, hues like hers ? Or can it mix them with that matchless skill, And lose them in each other, as appears In every bud that blows...
Page 748 - As for the making of knots, or figures, with divers coloured earths, that they may lie under the windows of the house on that side on which the garden stands, they be but toys: you may see as good sights many times in tarts.
Page 60 - The excess of fermentation tends to the destruction and dissipation of the most useful part of the manure ; and the ultimate results of this process are like those of combustion. It is a common practice amongst farmers to...
Page 43 - ... a difference in temperature, of some magnitude, was always observed on still and serene nights, between bodies sheltered from the sky by substances touching them, and similar bodies, which were sheltered by a substance a little above them. I found, for example, upon one night, that the warmth of grass, sheltered by a cambric handkerchief raised a few inches in the air, was 3...
Page 43 - I earth become, during a still and serene night, colder than the atmosphere, by radiating their heat to the heavens, I perceived immediately a just reason for the practice which I had before deemed useless. Being desirous, however, of acquiring some precise information on this subject...
Page 14 - The specific gravity of a soil, or the relation of its weight to that of water, may be ascertained by introducing into a phial, which will contain a known quantity of water, equal volumes of water and of soil, and this may be easily done by pouring in water till it is half full, and then adding the soil till the fluid rises to the mouth ; the difference between the weight of the soil and that of the water, will give the result.
Page 51 - ... alternately superior, the valve is kept in a constant state of vibration, or of opening and shutting, without any external aid whatever. Such is the principle upon which the motion of the water in the pipe...
Page 14 - Thus, if the bottle contains four hundred grains of water, and gains two hundred grains when half filled with water and half with soil, the specific gravity of the soil will be 2 ; that is, it will be twice as heavy as water ; and if it gained 165 grains, its specific gravity would be 1825, water being 1000.
Page 285 - The power of procuring intermediate varieties by the intermixture of the pollen and stigma of two different parents is, however, that which most deserves consideration. We all know that hybrid plants are constantly produced in every garden, and that improvements of the most remarkable kind are yearly occurring in consequence.
Page 51 - ... to which the valve has been adjusted, but is superior to it, by which it is enabled to overpower the resistance of the weight t, and it carries the valve up with it, and closes the orifice r. This is no sooner done, than the water is constrained to become stationary again, by which the momentum is...

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