New Commentaries of the Criminal Law Upon a New System of Legal Exposition, Volume 1

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T.H. Flood, 1892 - Criminal law
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Page 105 - that the laws of the several States, except where the Constitution, treaties, or statutes of the United States shall otherwise require or provide, shall be regarded as rules of decision in trials at common law in the courts of the United States, in cases where they apply.
Page 159 - Every law that makes an action done before the passing of the law, and which was innocent when done, criminal; and punishes such action.
Page 98 - When committed upon the high seas, or on any other waters within the admiralty and maritime jurisdiction of the United States and out of the jurisdiction of any particular State...
Page 102 - to exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever over such district, not exceeding ten miles square, as may by cession of particular states, and the acceptance of Congress, become the seat of government of the United States...
Page 543 - A pardon is an act of grace, proceeding from the power intrusted with the execution of the laws, which exempts the individual, on whom it is bestowed, from the punishment the law inflicts for a crime he has committed.
Page 65 - The laws of no nation can justly extend beyond its own territories, except so far as regards its own citizens. They can have no force to control the sovereignty or rights of any other nation, within its own jurisdiction. And, however general and comprehensive the phrases used in our municipal laws may be, they must always be restricted in construction, to places and persons, upon whom the legislature have authority and jurisdiction.
Page 292 - ... any false news or tales, whereby discord, or occasion of discord or slander, may grow between the King and his people, or the great men of the realm ; and he that doth so, shall be taken and kept in prison, until he hath brought him into the court, which was the first author of the tale.
Page 208 - It must not be supposed that, in refusing to admit temptation to be an excuse for crime, it is forgotten how terrible the temptation was, how awful the suffering, how hard in such trials to keep the judgment straight and the conduct pure. We are often compelled to set up standards we cannot reach ourselves and to la}- down rules which we could not ourselves satisfy.
Page 459 - Between preparation for the attempt and the attempt itself, there is a wide difference. The preparation consists in devising or arranging the means or measures necessary for the commission of the offense; the attempt is the direct movement toward the commission after the preparations are made.
Page 234 - If the accused was conscious that the act was one which he ought not to do, and if that act was at the same time contrary to the law of the land, he is punishable...

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