New Education Readers: A Synthetic and Phonic Word Method : Book Three : Development of Obscure Vowels, Initials, and Terminals

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American Book Company, 1901 - English language - 160 pages
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Page 102 - THE stormy March is come at last, With wind, and cloud, and changing skies. I hear the rushing of the blast, That through the snowy valley flies Ah, passing few are they who speak, Wild stormy month! in praise of thee; Yet, though thy winds are loud and bleak, Thou art a welcome month to me. For thou, to northern lands, again The glad and glorious sun dost bring, And thou hast joined the gentle train And wear'st the gentle name of Spring.
Page 87 - Where did you get your eyes so blue ? " " Out of the sky as I came through." " What makes the light in them sparkle and spin ? " " Some of the starry spikes left in." " Where did you get that little tear ? " " I found it waiting when I got here.
Page 24 - O suns and skies and clouds of June, And flowers of June together, Ye cannot rival for one hour October's bright blue weather...
Page 122 - The alder by the river Shakes out her powdery curls ; The willow buds in silver For little boys and girls. The little birds fly over, And oh, how sweet they sing, To tell the happy children That once again 'tis spring.
Page 75 - And still fluttered down the snow. I stood and watched by the window The noiseless work of the sky, And the sudden flurries of snow-birds, Like brown leaves whirling by. I thought of a mound in sweet Auburn Where a little headstone stood; How the flakes were folding it gently, As did robins the babes in the wood. Up spoke our own little Mabel, Saying, "Father, who makes it snow?
Page 75 - THE snow had begun in the gloaming, And busily all the night Had been heaping field and highway With a silence deep and white. Every pine and fir and hemlock Wore ermine too dear for an earl, And the poorest twig on the elm-tree Was ridged inch deep with pearl.
Page 123 - tis spring. The gay green grass comes creeping So soft beneath their feet ; The frogs begin to ripple A music clear and sweet. And buttercups are coming, And scarlet columbine ; And in the sunny meadows The dandelions shine. And just as many daisies As their soft hands can hold The little ones may gather, All fair in white and gold. Here blows the warm red clover, There peeps the violet blue ; O happy little children, God made them all for you ! Celia Thaxter.
Page 87 - Where did you get those arms and hands ? Love made itself into bonds and bands. Feet, whence did you come, you darling things ? From the same box as the cherubs' wings. How did they all just come to be you ? God thought about me, and so I grew.
Page 76 - Again I looked at the snow-fall, And thought of the leaden sky That arched o'er our first great sorrow, When that mound was heaped so high. I...
Page 76 - Then, with eyes that saw not, I kissed her; And she, kissing back, could not know That my kiss was given to her sister, Folded close under deepening snow.

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