New Manual of Homoeopathic Veterinary Medicine:...

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O. Clapp, 1847 - Homeopathic veterinary medicine - 408 pages
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Page 307 - I give an ounce every two, three, or four hours, according to the severity of the case — that will be from twelve to thirty-six grains of quinine in the twenty -four hours according to the case.
Page 353 - We think that no unprejudiced spectator of real taste can hesitate for a moment in preferring the head of the Antinous, for example, to that of the Apollo. And in general it may be laid down as a rule, that the most perfect of the antiques are. the most...
Page 326 - ... its head, depresses its ears and sinks rapidly in flesh ; its eye becomes dull and glassy, the wool loses its brightness and comes easily from the skin, the breath becomes fetid, the bowels variable, at one time loose, at another costive ; the skin becomes yellow and sometimes spotted with black ; the eyelids are swollen ; the lips, gums and palate have a pale tint; emaciation at this time becomes rapid — fever is induced and death quickly follows. The methods by which the disease in its early...
Page 128 - Some horses have an hereditary predisposition to it, and mares are considered more subject to it than stallions. Further, it is scarcely ever observed except in hot weather, and as it is generally at the beginning of summer that it commences to appear, it goes away always in autumn, at least with respect to its chief symptoms. These are the following: the horse, a little before lively and active, begins all of a sudden to appear heavy and indolent; he is dejected, and prefers to keep himself in the...
Page 127 - By vertigo is meant a chronic disease of the horse, chiefly indicated by a disturbance of the sensitive faculties, occasioning derangement in the ordinary functions of life. Much that is incorrect has been 'written regarding the seat, properly so called, of the evil : at present, most veterinary surgeons are agreed in seeking the proximate cause, not as formerly, in the brain, but in the abdominal organs, and in considering the cerebral affection as purely secondary.
Page 344 - Sheep are often observed to describe concentric circles for whole hours, then step forwards a few paces, then again stop, and turn round again. The older the disease, the more the animal turns, until at length it does it even in a trot. The appetite goes on diminishing, emaciation becomes more and more perceptible, and the state of exhaustion terminates in death. On opening the body, the seat of the disease is always found to be in the brain; accordingly, there are met either beneath the bones of...
Page 128 - ... cerebral affection as purely secondary. The vertigo often succeeds acute encephalitis, the intensity of which has diminished to a certain degree ; but very frequently also it comes on without having been preceded by inflammation of the brain. It recognizes the same causes as the latter, isolation, confinement in hot and badly aired stables, cold, extreme fatigue, blows and injuries on the head, indigestion, unwholesome or too much food in proportion to the exercise taken. The fear of punishment,...
Page 129 - The animal runs on quite blind till some obstacle stops him, or turns round, or remains tranquil, with his head depressed, and the legs crowded beneath the body, without being able to change this unusual attitude, unless assisted to do so. There is never any fever. The pulse is often from ten to twelve pulsations slower than in the normal state. In the same way, also, the respiration is constantly slow, deep, and frequently of a sighing character. In almost all cases, the tongue is foul, and the...
Page 230 - ... fluid which the soft parts secrete, and make their escape thence in the following spring, in order to become metamorphosed. The greater the number of tumors, the more is the strength of the animal diminished by the pain and suppuration. For this reason, we should endeavor to free...
Page 128 - ... taken. The fear of punishment, especially of the whip, occasionally gives rise to it, in sensitive and irritable animals. Some horses have an hereditary predisposition to it, and mares are considered more subject to it than stallions. Further, it is scarcely ever observed except in hot weather; and as it is generally at the beginning of summer that it commences to appear, it goes away always in autumn, at least with respect to its chief symptoms. Symptoms. — The horse having, previous to the...

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