New Second Reader

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E.H. Butler, 1885 - Readers - 160 pages
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Page 83 - What does little birdie say In her nest at peep of day ? Let me fly, says little birdie, Mother, let me fly away. Birdie, rest a little longer, Till the little wings are stronger. So she rests a little longer, Then she flies away. What does little baby say, In her bed at peep of day ? Baby says, like little birdie, Let me rise and fly away.
Page 75 - COME, little leaves," said the wind one day, — " Come o'er the meadows with me, and play; Put on your dresses of red and gold : Summer is gone, and the days grow cold." Soon as the leaves heard the wind's loud call, Down they came fluttering, one and all ; Over the brown fields they danced and flew, Singing the soft little songs they knew...
Page 129 - I love you, Mother," said rosy Nell; "I love you better than tongue can tell." Then she teased and pouted full half the day Till her mother rejoiced when she went to play. "I love you, Mother," said little John, Then forgetting his work, his cap went on, And he was off to the garden swing, Leaving his mother the wood to bring. "I love you, Mother," said little Fan; "Today I'll help you all I can.
Page 139 - STOP, stop, pretty water!" Said Mary, one day, . • To a frolicsome brook That was running away. "You run on so fast! I wish you would stay; My boat and my flowers You will carry away. "But I will run after; Mother says that I may; For I would know where You are running away.
Page 107 - O'er their way? Do you know how low and sweet O'er the pebbles at their feet, Are the words the waves repeat, Night and day ? Have you heard the robins singing, Little one, When the rosy dawn is breaking, — When 'tis done?
Page 59 - True, it seems a pleasant thing Nipping daisies in the spring; But what chilly nights I pass On the cold and dewy grass, Or pick my scanty dinner where All the ground is brown and bare ! Then the farmer comes at last, When the merry spring is past, Cuts my woolly fleece away, For your coat in wintry day. Little master, this is why In the pleasant fields I lie.
Page 129 - I love you, mother," said rosy Nell; "I love you better than tongue can tell; " Then she teased and pouted full half the day, Till her mother rejoiced when she went to play. "I love you, mother," said little Fan; "To-day I'll help you all I can; How glad I am that school doesn't keep!
Page 75 - Dear little lambs, in your fleecy fold, Mother will keep you from harm and cold; Fondly we've watched you in vale and glade; Say, will you dream of our loving shade?
Page 59 - The Sheep. LAZY sheep, pray tell me why In the pleasant fields you lie, Eating grass and daisies white, From the morning till the night ? Every thing can something do, But what kind of use are you...
Page 158 - So live, my child, all through your life, That, be it short or long, Though others may forget your looks They'll not forget your song.

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