Newman and Heresy: The Anglican Years

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 30, 2003 - Religion - 352 pages
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This 1991 book describes the close relationship between the historical researches and the teeming world of early nineteenth-century controversy. The setting is Oxford between the 1820s and the 1840s, when Newman made his ambitious and doomed attempt to re-invent the 'catholicity' of the Church of England. The author shows that in Newman's battle against the Protestant wing of the Church of England, and the (to him) even more sinister 'liberals', he saw parallels with the struggle of the early Church against heresy. Newman's 'rediscovery' of ancient Patristic writers and heretics was thus part of a strategy to revive Catholicism within the Anglican Church. Dr Thomas shows how Newman's eventual conversion to Rome in 1845 may be understood as a change in his perception of heresy, and a realisation of the applicability of his own polemic to his Anglican self.
 

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Contents

Heresy and orthodoxy in the Evangelical period
9
The Arians of the Fourth Century and its background 18281832
20
Newmans Tractarian rhetoric 18331837
50
Conclusions rhetoric and politics
59
ATTACK SABELLIANISM AND APOLLINARIANISMLIBERALISM UNMASKED
63
New directions the mid1830s
65
Patristic research the edition of Dionysius of Alexandria
68
The Hampden Controversy
71
Apollinarianism revisited
142
Sabellianism revisited
149
Heresy typology and the encodement of experience
165
RETREAT AND REALIGNMENT MONOPHYSITISM AND THE COLLAPSE OF THE VIA MEDIA
169
Construction
171
Collapse
203
Rhetoric refashioned
228
Conclusion
248

Blanco White
80
Apollinarianism
88
Tract 73 On the Introduction of Rationalist Principles into Revealed Religion
108
The Elucidations on Hampden
140
Notes
257
Bibliography
320
Index
332
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