News and the British World: The Emergence of an Imperial Press System, 1876-1922

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During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa were increasingly drawn together by an imperial press system. This is the first scholarly study of the development of that system. Revealed to contemporaries by the SouthAfrican War, the basis on which the system would develop soon became the focus for debate. Commercial organizations, including newspaper combinations and news agencies such as Reuters, fought to protect their interests, while 'ccnstructive imperialists' attempted to enlist the power of the state tostrrengthen the system. Debate culminated in fierce controversies over state censorship and propaganda during and after the First World War.Based on extensive archival research, this study addresses crucial themes, including the impact of empire on the press, Britain's imperial experience, and the idea of a 'British world.' Challenging earlier nationalist accounts, Dr Potter draws out the ambiguous impact of the imperial press systemon local, national, and imperial identities.
 

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Contents

The Roots of an Imperial Press System 12
27
News Distribution and the South African War
36
Constructive Imperialism State Intervention
56
The Role of Reuters
87
The British Press and News from the Dominions
106
The Imperial Press Conference of 1909
132
The Imperial Politics of the Press
160
The Imperial Press System and
186
Conclusions
211
Bibliography
217
Index
239
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Simon J. Potter is a Lecturer in Imperial History, National University of Ireland, Galway.

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