News from Tartary: A Journey from Peking to Kashmir

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Northwestern University Press, 1999 - Travel - 384 pages
3 Reviews
Originally published in 1936, News from Tartary is the story of a journey from Peking through the mysterious province of Sinkiang, to India. Fleming tells the story in his inimitable manner, dismissing the difficulties with irony and describing events and developments with humor and brilliant color, and his account is a classic of travel writing as well as a brilliant description of a vanished time and way of life.
 

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User Review  - moncur_d - LibraryThing

intriguing, very 1930's travel book, that both gives insight into the politics and instability of the warlord period of Chinese history and the last stages of the great game as played out by Britain ... Read full review

Contents

FOREWORD II
11
ZERO HOUR
17
ffl TWOS COMPANY?
26
EXILES AND ARMAMENTS
34
NIGHTMARE TRAIN
41
Vin FITS AND STARTS
50
OPEN ARREST
61
THE MOUNTAIN ROAD
71
VH GRASS MEN NEWS
219
Vffl THALASSA THALASSA
226
BRAVE NEW WORLD
233
DIRTY WORK
245
HI RUSSIA RACKETEERS
256
CHERCHEN
266
VH SUCH QUANTITIES OF SAND
277
A CUCKOOCLOCK IN KERIYA
283

HI CONFINED TO BARRACKS
80
THE GREAT LAMASERY
86
ESCAPE FROM OFFICIALDOM
92
TRAVELLING LIGHT
107
THE DEMONS LAKE
118
WINDS AND WILD ASSES
130
NIGHTMARCH TO THE END OF THE WORLD
137
THE LOST CITY
147
H PATIENCE
154
THE GOOD COMPANIONS
165
TRAVELLING BLIND
171
THE GORGES OF THE BORON KOL
185
n LOST
191
BIRTHDAY
201
WE SAY GOODBYE TO SLALOM
212
REBELS DONT CARE
288
KHOTAN
294
THE VANISHED LEADER
300
XH THE LAST OF TUNGAN TERRITORY
307
HOBOES ON HORSEBACK
313
KASHGARLESBAINS
323
n WINGS OVER TURKISTAN
329
THE LAST TOWN IN CHINA
339
THE RUSSIAN AGENT 34 5
345
VH NEWS FROM HOME
354
VIE A THOUSAND WELCOMES
360
GILGIT AT LAST
370
XU TRIUMPHAL ENTRY
379
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About the author (1999)

Peter Fleming (1907-1971), the brother of novelist Ian Fleming, wrote for the London Evening Standard, the Spectator, the BBC, and the Times of London. His travels took him to Mexico, Brazil, Russia, China, Japan, Tibet, and Manchuria. He died in a hunting accident in Scotland.
 

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