Newton's London Journal of Arts and Sciences: Being Record of the Progress of Invention as Applied to the Arts...

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W. Newton, 1830 - Technology
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Page 348 - has been generally understood to denote, either a thing made which is useful for its own sake and vendible as such, as a medicine, a stove, a telescope, and many others; or to mean an engine or instrument, or some part of an engine or instrument, to be employed either in the making of some previously known article, or in some other useful purpose, as a...
Page 330 - Street, in the Parish of St. Mary-le-bone, in the County of Middlesex, Esq. for his invention of an...
Page 348 - Or it may, perhaps, extend also to a new process to be carried on by known implements, or elements, acting upon known substances, and ultimately producing some other known substance, but producing it in a cheaper or more expeditious manner, or of a better and more useful kind. But no merely philosophical or abstract principle can answer to the word manufactures.
Page 375 - Throgmortonstreet, in the city of London, merchant, in consequence of a communication made to him by a certain foreigner residing abroad, for an improved method of preparing, cleansing, paddy, or rough rice.
Page 370 - ... of water elevated. But the sensibility of the instrument might be increased at pleasure, by mixing with the water a greater or less quantity of alcohol, by which the excess of its specific gravity over that of the oil may be reduced to one-twentieth, one-thirtieth, or any other assignable proportion. The instrument may be converted into an areometer, by closing both the cisterns, and by applying to the upper part of each a trumpetmouthed aperture, opening latterly.
Page 81 - The pin of the relieving click, which goes into the groove of the barrel pulley, receives a pressure from the chain ; it brings the click part out of the ratchet, and gives free action to the ratchet on the fusee arbor to return back again without any drag or incumbrance of the click.
Page 347 - ... sole working or making of any manner of new manufacture within this realm...
Page 338 - ... being ready, I procure a round stone, of any quality which is capable of withstanding the strong heat of a reverberatory furnace, without cracking or breaking, and upon this stone the small pieces of steel are piled as closely and compactly as possible; the whole is then inclosed in a fire clay crucible, and placed in a reverberatory furnace, where it is allowed to remain until the whole mass becomes of a high welding heat ; it is then taken from the crucible and placed under a heavy...
Page 369 - ... of more extensive utility. A glass tube, of which the internal diameter is at least a quarter of an inch, being bent in the middle into the form of an inverted syphon, with the legs parallel to each other, is cemented at each of its open extremities into the bottom of a separate cistern, about two inches in diameter. One of these cisterns is closed on all sides, excepting where a small horizontal pipe opens from it laterally at its upper part ; while the other cistern remains open. The lower...
Page 348 - manufactures ' has been generally understood to denote either a thing made, which is useful for its own sake, and vendible as such, as a medicine, a stove, a telescope, and many others, or to mean an engine or instrument, or some part of an engine or instrument, to be employed, either in the making of some previously known article, or in some other useful purpose, as a stocking-frame, or a steam-engine for raising water from mines.

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