The Next Reformation: Why Evangelicals Must Embrace Postmodernity

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Baker Academic, Nov 1, 2004 - Religion - 240 pages
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Can evangelical Christianity be postmodern? In The Next Reformation, Carl Raschke describes the impact of postmodernism on evangelical thought and argues that the two ideologies are not mutually exclusive. Instead, Christians must learn to worship and minister within the framework of postmodernism or risk becoming irrelevant. In this significant and timely discussion, Raschke demonstrates how to reconcile postmodernism with Christian faith.

This book will appeal to readers interested in the relationship between postmodernism and Christian faith as well as church leaders and pastors wrestling with the practical implications of cultural changes for worship and ministry.

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User Review  - KirkLowery - LibraryThing

It is important to know that this author's defining religious experience was in a charismatic context. His primary thesis is that the "foundationalism" of the Enlightenment and modernism has been ... Read full review

The next reformation: why evangelicals must embrace postmodernity

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

What would happen if Christians embraced postmodernism instead of resisted it? Could it lead to a veritable revival or revolution? According to Raschke (religious studies, Univ. of Denver), the answer ... Read full review


Derrida and the Origins
Origins of Religious Postmodernism
Beyond Worldviews
Beyond Inerrancy
From Hierarchy
Postmodern Revivalism
Charismatic Renewal and the Deconstruction
The Next Reformation

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About the author (2004)

Carl Raschke (Ph.D., Harvard University) is professor and chair of the department of religious studies at the University of Denver. He is senior editor of the Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory and the author of numerous books and hundreds of articles. Raschke is also an adjunct faculty member at Mars Hill Graduate School (Seattle) and has been actively involved in recent years with various emergent church networks and postmodern ministry initiatives around the country.

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