Next Steps Toward Teaching the Reggio Way: Accepting the Challenge to Change

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Joanne Hendrick
Pearson/Merrill/Prentice Hall, 2004 - Education - 288 pages
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More than a presentation of the Reggio Emilia philosophy, yet not a "how to do it" volume, this book is a progress report of the steps American and Canadian teachers have taken in the last six years toward teaching the Reggio Emilia way. Comprising chapters by the leading advocates of the Reggio Emilia approach, it examines how real teachers in real classrooms are applying the principles of Reggio Emilia on an everyday basis. By combining discussion of Reggio Emilia concepts with examples of their application in American schools, it explores this emergent curriculum and helps future teachers see how to advocate for it in their own school or program.Discusses the Reggio system's support for the rights of the very young; Multicultural coverage guides readers to an understanding of the delicate balance between school and community—gives them practical strategies for building strong community bonds; Two chapters on working with parents examine the role of parents in children's educational development and the interplay between them and their children's teachers. Illustrates through examples the Reggio Emilia approach as it happens in American schools—highlights similarities and differences between the Italian curriculum and the American, as well as between American and Italian attitudes on education, children, parents, community, and other topics.For teachers or future teachers interested in learning more about the Reggio Emilia philosophy.

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Contents

A Brief Reggio Emilia Story
2
Foundations of the Reggio Emilia Approach
15
Connections with Ntalaguzzi
27
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Joanne Hendrick" is professor emerita of early childhood education from the University of Oklahoma. In addition to raising four children of her own, her practical experience includes working with children at the Stanford Speech and Hearing Clinic, directing a parent-child workshop, working in Head Start, and chairing the early childhood areas at Santa Barbara City College and the University of Oklahoma. She holds an undergraduate degree from Stanford University in disorders of speech and hearing and graduate degrees from the University of California in counseling and early childhood education. She is past president of the California Association for the Education of Young Children.

Her current interests include gardening, photography, traveling to exotic places, writing about young children, and enjoying her ten grandchildren.

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