Nicaragua: Past, Present and Future: A Description of Its Inhabitants, Customs, Mines, Minerals, Early History, Modern Filibusterism, Proposed Inter-oceanic Canal and Manifest Destiny

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J.E. Potter, 1859 - Nicaragua - 372 pages
 

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Page 272 - Britain hereby declare, that neither the one nor the other will ever obtain or maintain for itself any exclusive control over the said ship canal; agreeing that neither will ever erect or maintain any fortifications commanding the same or in the vicinity thereof, or occupy, or fortify, or colonize, or assume or exercise any dominion over Nicaragua, Costa Rica, the Mosquito coast, or any part of Central America...
Page 203 - Title, and to the restoring of such prizes in the cases in which restoration shall be adjudged; and also for the purpose of preventing the carrying on of any such expedition or enterprise from the territories or jurisdiction of the United States against the territories or dominions of any foreign prince or state, or of any colony, district, or people with whom the United States are at peace.
Page 243 - His Catholic Majesty, prompted solely by motives of humanity, promises to the King of England that he will not exercise any act of severity against the Mosquitos inhabiting in part the countries which are to be evacuated by virtue of the present convention, on account of the connections which may have subsisted between the said Indians and the English: and His Britannic Majesty, on his part, will strictly prohibit all his subjects from furnishing arms or warlike stores to the Indians in general situated...
Page 283 - It is a highway in which they themselves have little interest when compared with the vast interests of the rest of the world. Whilst their rights of sovereignty ought to be respected, it is the duty of other nations to require that this important passage shall not be interrupted by the civil wars and revolutionary outbreaks which have so frequently occurred in that region.
Page 294 - They are founded on the political circumstances of the American Continent, which has interests of its own, and ought to have a policy of its own, disconnected from many of the questions which are continually presenting themselves in Europe, concerning the balance ,of power, and other subjects of controversy arising out of the condition of its States, and which often find their solution or their postponement in war.
Page 242 - His Britannic Majesty's subjects, and the other colonists who have hitherto enjoyed the protection of England, shall evacuate the country of the Mosquitos, as well as the continent in general, and the islands adjacent, without exception...
Page 243 - In this view, his Britannic Majesty engages to give the most positive orders for the evacuation of the countries above mentioned by all his subjects, of whatever denomination ; but if, contrary to such declaration, there should still remain any persons so daring as to presume, by retiring into the interior country, to...
Page 285 - I earnestly recommend to Congress the passage of an act authorizing the President, under such restrictions as they may deem proper, to employ the land and naval forces of the United States in preventing the transit from being obstructed or closed by lawless violence, and in protecting the lives and property of American citizens traveling thereupon, requiring at the same time that these forces shall be withdrawn the moment the danger shall have passed away.
Page 203 - September, 1857, which states that " there is reason to believe that lawless persons are now engaged within the limits of the United States, in setting on foot and preparing the means for military expeditions, to be carried on against the territories of Mexico, Nicaragua, and Costa llica ;" after which it proceeds to call upon the district attorneys and marshals " to use all due diligence, and to avail " themselves "of all legitimate means at" their " command" to enforce the provisions of the act...
Page 242 - ... other colonists who have hitherto enjoyed the protection of England, shall evacuate the country of the Mosquitos, as well as the continent in general, and the islands adjacent, without exception, situated beyond the line hereinafter described, as what ought to be the frontier of the extent of territory granted by His Catholic Majesty to the English...

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