Nicholas Nickleby: A Faithful Account of the Fortunes, Misfortunes, Uprisings, Downfallings and Complete Career of the Nickelby Family

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The Floating Press, Jan 1, 2009 - Fiction - 1693 pages
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Nicholas Nickleby is left responsible for his mother and sister when his father dies. The novel follows his attempt to succeed in supporting them, despite his uncle Ralph's antagonistic lack of belief in him. It is one of Dickens' early comic novels.
 

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Contents

Chapter 34
885
Chapter 35
920
Chapter 36
954
Chapter 37
972
Chapter 38
1006
Chapter 39
1037
Chapter 40
1056
Chapter 41
1092

Chapter 8
187
Chapter 9
214
Chapter 10
248
Chapter 11
278
Chapter 12
290
Chapter 13
314
Chapter 14
344
Chapter 15
369
Chapter 16
396
Chapter 17
437
Chapter 18
457
Chapter 19
485
Chapter 20
519
Chapter 21
543
Chapter 22
570
Chapter 23
602
Chapter 24
630
Chapter 25
664
Chapter 26
693
Chapter 27
716
Chapter 28
746
Chapter 29
780
Chapter 30
800
Chapter 31
832
Chapter 32
848
Chapter 33
870
Chapter 42
1118
Chapter 43
1142
Chapter 44
1169
Chapter 45
1200
Chapter 46
1226
Chapter 47
1254
Chapter 48
1286
Chapter 49
1309
Chapter 50
1340
Chapter 51
1368
Chapter 52
1393
Chapter 53
1419
Chapter 54
1452
Chapter 55
1477
Chapter 56
1501
Chapter 57
1527
Chapter 58
1549
Chapter 59
1561
Chapter 60
1590
Chapter 61
1613
Chapter 62
1634
Chapter 63
1646
Chapter 64
1668
Chapter 65
1687
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About the author (2009)

Charles Dickens, perhaps the best British novelist of the Victorian era, was born in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England on February 7, 1812. His happy early childhood was interrupted when his father was sent to debtors' prison, and young Dickens had to go to work in a factory at age twelve. Later, he took jobs as an office boy and journalist before publishing essays and stories in the 1830s. His first novel, The Pickwick Papers, made him a famous and popular author at the age of twenty-five. Subsequent works were published serially in periodicals and cemented his reputation as a master of colorful characterization, and as a harsh critic of social evils and corrupt institutions. His many books include Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, Bleak House, Great Expectations, Little Dorrit, A Christmas Carol, and A Tale of Two Cities. Dickens married Catherine Hogarth in 1836, and the couple had nine children before separating in 1858 when he began a long affair with Ellen Ternan, a young actress. Despite the scandal, Dickens remained a public figure, appearing often to read his fiction. He died in 1870, leaving his final novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, unfinished.

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