Night Mare

Front Cover
Ballantine Books, 1987 - Fiction - 307 pages
The danger to Xanth was so great that only a night mare could offer hope!

The Nextwave of barbarian warriors was invading Xanth from the north, ravaging and destroying as they advanced. But Mare Imbrium had her own problems. Ever since she had gained the half soul, the night mare had begun to mishandle her job of delivering bad dreams. Now the night Stallion dismissed her, exiling her to the day world with a message for King Trent: Beware the Horseman!

She had no idea what that meant. But that was the way with prophetic warnings--nobody could understand them until it was too late.

Then she met the Horseman. And she discovered that one who would right a night mare was a master of a bit and spur, and not a man to surrender her.

For the night mare, it all began to be a horrible nightmare!

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - utbw42 - LibraryThing

Least enjoyable of the six Xanth books I've read so far, but still a good yarn. I don't think this one was as clever as the others, just more straightforward story telling with existing characters. Still enjoyed it...and will tackle the next one soon. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Scoshie - LibraryThing

#6 in the series-- this was the book that made me start to read the books. I saw the original Oil painting sold at a Con and LOVED it and had toread the books!!! "Xanth is under threat of a barbarian ... Read full review

Contents

Map of Xanth
1
The Day Horse
13
Centycore et Cetera
30
Copyright

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About the author (1987)

Piers Anthony, sometimes called Pier Xanthony, is the pseudonym of a Mundane character who was born in England in 1934, came to America in 1940, was naturalized in 1958, and moved to Xanth in 1977. His first story was published in 1963, and his first novel, Chthon, in 1967. His first Xanth novel, A Spell for Chameleon, won the August Derleth Fantasy Award as the best novel for 1977, and his fantasy novels began placing on the New York Times bestseller list with Ogre, Ogre. He shifted from writing in pencil to writing on the computer, and Golem in the Gears was his first novel created on the machine; naturally, the computer found its way into Xanth.

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