Night and Day

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CIUS Press, 1988 - Fiction - 242 pages
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A memoir in novel form, Night and Day is the third novel in a trilogy tracing the life of Mykola Stepanovych Haievsky, both a self-portrait of Gzhytsky and a depiction of a Galician intellectual of the first half of the twentieth century. The title of the first part, Into the Wide World, conveys Haievsky's decision to entrust his fate to the nascent Soviet Union, while that of the second part, Great Hopes, reaffirms (with accompanying evil omens) his faith in the future of the Soviet Union. The title of the third part, Night and Day, conveys several ideas: the disillusionment of imprisonment and exile, followed by renewed hopes (explicit in the final words); constant unremitting and repetitive sequence of night and day in the North, with overtones of Gzhytsky's love of nature; the white nights and "black days", the more general implications of the inseparability of good and evil and the great power of fate; and, though this is most certainly an exaggeration, relations between man and woman, a theme given prominence throughout the trilogy, particularly in this third part, with its setting in the Soviet prison camps.
 

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Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
13
Section 3
17
Section 4
25
Section 5
35
Section 6
41
Section 7
47
Section 8
55
Section 14
111
Section 15
125
Section 16
143
Section 17
157
Section 18
177
Section 19
191
Section 20
199
Section 21
211

Section 9
67
Section 10
73
Section 11
81
Section 12
91
Section 13
99
Section 22
219
Section 23
227
Section 24
233
Section 25
235
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