Night and Day

Front Cover
The Floating Press, Jun 1, 2010 - Fiction - 527 pages
1 Review
A bold experiment in modernist fiction, Virginia Woolf's novel Night and Day is a study in contrasts. The narrative ricochets between the lives and thoughts of two friends, Katharine Hilbery and Mary Datchet, using the stark differences and points of similarity between them to construct an engrossingly complex and detailed portrait and social commentary.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Night And Day

User Review  - Lizzie - Goodreads

Read on DailyLit in 197 parts, over 9 months or so because some days I just had to repeatedly click here to receive the next installment immediately. I didn't think it would pick up at first, but then ... Read full review

Contents

Chapter I
6
Chapter II
27
Chapter III
46
Chapter IV
61
Chapter V
86
Chapter VI
105
Chapter VII
134
Chapter VIII
146
Chapter XIX
352
Chapter XX
362
Chapter XXI
379
Chapter XXII
396
Chapter XXIII
415
Chapter XXIV
433
Chapter XXV
467
Chapter XXVI
484

Chapter IX
157
Chapter X
175
Chapter XI
189
Chapter XII
203
Chapter XIII
225
Chapter XIV
233
Chapter XV
251
Chapter XVI
272
Chapter XVII
294
Chapter XVIII
310
Chapter XXVII
520
Chapter XXVIII
550
Chapter XXIX
572
Chapter XXX
599
Chapter XXXI
616
Chapter XXXII
655
Chapter XXXIII
691
Chapter XXXIV
724
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Virginia Woolf was born in London, England on January 25, 1882. She was the daughter of the prominent literary critic Leslie Stephen. Her early education was obtained at home through her parents and governesses. After death of her father in 1904, her family moved to Bloomsbury, where they formed the nucleus of the Bloomsbury Group, a circle of philosophers, writers, and artists. During her lifetime, she wrote both fiction and non-fiction works. Her novels included Jacob's Room, Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, Orlando, and Between the Acts. Her non-fiction books included The Common Reader, A Room of One's Own, Three Guineas, The Captain's Death Bed and Other Essays, and The Death of the Moth and Other Essays. Having had periods of depression throughout her life and fearing a final mental breakdown from which she might not recover, Woolf drowned herself on March 28, 1941 at the age of 59. Her husband published part of her farewell letter to deny that she had taken her life because she could not face the terrible times of war.

Bibliographic information