Nightmare Abbey

Front Cover
The Floating Press, Feb 1, 2010 - Fiction - 106 pages
2 Reviews
Nightmare Abbey is a satirical novel, poking fun at the morbid obsessions of romantic literature. Peacock also took the opportunity to caricature and pillory actual historical figures. It centers around the melancholy gentleman and his son who inhabit Nightmare Abbey, their array of guests, and their depressing servants.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wirkman - LibraryThing

It's been nearly thirty years since I've read this. All I can remember of it is that I thought it quite good. Very funny. One of those few comedies of the 19th century to carry over in mirth to the present day. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wirkman - LibraryThing

Classics of the novel of dialogue, precursors to early Aldous Huxley, and fine, fun romps in their own right. Read full review

Contents

Chapter I
6
Chapter II
18
Chapter III
23
Chapter IV
31
Chapter V
38
Chapter VI
48
Chapter VII
62
Chapter VIII
77
Chapter X
95
Chapter XI
105
Chapter XII
122
Chapter XIII
132
Chapter XIV
145
Chapter XV
153
Endnotes
160
Copyright

Chapter IX
87

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About the author (2010)

Thomas Love Peacock was born on October 18, 1785. He was largely self-educated and worked most of his life for the East India Company. During this time, he mastered Greek, Latin, Italian, French, and Welsh. He became chief examiner in 1836 and retired on a pension in 1856. He wrote seven novels during his lifetime including Headlong Hall, Melincourt, Nightmare Abbey, Crotchet Castle, and Gryll Grange. He died on January 23, 1866 at the age of 81 from injuries sustained in a fire in which he had attempted to save his library.

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