Gothic: Nineteenth-century Gothic : at home with the vampire

Front Cover
Fred Botting, Dale Townshend
Taylor & Francis, 2004 - Gothic revival (Literature) - 346 pages
0 Reviews
This collection brings together key writings which convey the breadth of what is understood to be Gothic, and the ways in which it has produced, reinforced, and undermined received ideas about literature and culture. In addition to its interests in the late eighteenth-century origins of the form, this collection anthologizes path-breaking essays on most aspects of gothic production, including some of its nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first century manifestations across a broad range of cultural media.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

I shall be with you on your weddingnight Lacan and the uncanny
12
Melmoth the Wanderer Gothic on Gothic
31
Hieroglyphics in fire Melmoth the Wanderer
45
That kingdom of gloom Charlotte Bronte the Annuals and the Gothic
62
Heathcliff as vampire
80
The fall of the house of Clennam Gothic conventions in Little Dorrit
89
The precautions of nervous people are infectious Sheridan Le Fanus symptomatic Gothic
97
Carmilla the arts of repression
117
The haunted closet Henry Jamess queer spectrality
178
The Gothic and the otherings of ascendent culture the original Phantom of the Opera
205
Psychopathia sexualis Stevensons Strange Case
226
The inner chambers of all nameless sin The Beetle Gothic female sexuality and Oriental barbarism
241
Kiss me with those red lips gender and inversion in Bram Stokers Dracula
259
Terrors of the night Dracula and degeneration in the late nineteenth century
287
Purity and danger Dracula the Urban Gothic and the late Victorian degeneracy crisis
304
Dracula Stokers response to the New Woman
331

Death femininity and identification a recource to Ligeia
142
Tranced griefs Melvilles Pierre and the origins of the Gothic
158

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

Fred Botting has taught English Literature, Critical Theory, Film and Cultural Studies at the Universities of Lancaster, Keele and Cardiff. He has written extensively on Gothic fictions, and on theory, film and cultural forms. His current research projects include work on fiction and film dealing with figures of horror - zombies in particular - and on spectrality, the uncanny and sexuality.

Bibliographic information