The 9th Infantry Division in Vietnam: Unparalleled and Unequaled

Front Cover
University Press of Kentucky, Oct 5, 2010 - History - 195 pages
0 Reviews
A well-educated, outspoken member of a politically prominent family in Bowling Green, Kentucky, Josie Underwood (1840–1923) left behind one of the few intimate accounts of the Civil War written by a southern woman sympathetic to the Union. This vivid portrayal of the early years of the war begins several months before the first shots were fired on Fort Sumter in April 1861. “The Philistines are upon us,” twenty-year-old Josie writes in her diary, leaving no question about the alarm she feels when Confederate soldiers occupy her once-peaceful town. Offering a unique perspective on the tensions between the Union and the Confederacy, Josie reveals that Kentucky was a hotbed of political and military action, particularly in her hometown of Bowling Green, known as the Gibraltar of the Confederacy. Located along important rail and water routes that were vital for shipping supplies in and out of the Confederacy, the city linked the upper South’s trade and population centers and was strategically critical to both armies. Capturing the fright and frustration she and her family experienced when Bowling Green served as the Confederate army’s headquarters in the fall of 1861, Josie tells of soldiers who trampled fields, pilfered crops, burned fences, cut down trees, stole food, and invaded homes and businesses. In early 1862, Josie’s outspoken Unionist father, Warner Underwood, was ordered to evacuate the family’s Mount Air estate, which was later destroyed by occupying forces. Wartime hardships also strained relationships among Josie’s family, neighbors, and friends, whose passionate beliefs about Lincoln, slavery, and Kentucky’s secession divided them. Published for the first time, Josie Underwood’s Civil War Diary interweaves firsthand descriptions of the political unrest of the day with detailed accounts of an active social life filled with travel, parties, and suitors. Bringing to life a Unionist, slave-owning young woman who opposed both Lincoln’s policies and Kentucky’s secession, the diary dramatically chronicles the physical and emotional traumas visited on Josie’s family, community, and state during wartime.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Chapter 1
4
Chapter 2
12
Chapter 3
22
Chapter 4
79
Chapter 5
99
Chapter 6
111
Chapter 7
116
Chapter 10
147
Chapter 11
150
Appendix A
157
Appendix B
159
Appendix C
160
Appendix D
164
Appendix E
175
Notes
177

Chapter 8
137
Chapter 9
141

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Major General Ira A. Hunt Jr., USA [Ret.], is a 1945 graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point. He served as a battalion commander in the 8th Infantry Division in Europe and later was assigned to the Office of the Secretary of Defense. In 1965-1969, he was chief of staff and a brigade commander in the 9th Infantry Division in Vietnam. He returned to South-east Asia as deputy commander, USSAG, to oversee the wars in South Vietnam and Cambodia in 1973-1975.

Bibliographic information